Dr. Johan Martin Shultz 5th Great Grandfather


Battle of Kings Mountain

Dr. Martin Sultz

• Dr. Johan Martin Shultz was an ancestor of whom one can be proud. He was a man of fine reputation who was trusted and respected by those who knew him. Johan Martin (Martin) Shultz was born in Lancaster County, PA in 1740. He was the son of Johan Velten (Valentine) Shultz and his wife Maria Eva Stocker. Shultz had come to the new world before the Revolution and settled in Lancaster County, PA. Martin’s parents, it is believed, were from Westphalia, Germany. Apprenticeship As a young man, Martin was apprenticed to a cordwainer. A cordwainer is a shoemaker of fine boots and shoes. He uses finer leather and is considered more of a craftsman than a regular shoemaker or cobbler. Cobblers repair and use old leather; cordwainers use only new, finely tanned leathers. The word is connected with the word cordovan which today refers not only to a color, but also to a “vegetable tanned [leather] …used only for the highest quality shoes,” Thus, Martin was to become more than just a shoemaker; he was to become a craftsman. Martin Becomes of Age Apprenticeships usually lasted for seven years or until the apprentice became of age. Martin completed his apprenticeship in 1721 when he was 21 years old. Significantly, several important things happened that year. First he married Juliana Stentz, daughter of Heinrich and Dorothea Stentz, also from Germany. Second, he agreed to become the guardian of Philip Bayer, Juliana’s fifteen-year-old nephew who had been recently orphaned. Both these actions show good qualities of Martin’s character. He waited until he could afford a wife and family before he married. Next, he accepted a responsibility he was not required to take by agreeing to take Philip as an apprentice and ward. By doing this, he was required to teach Philp to read the Bible, to write, and to do arithmetic to the rule of three. He was also to provide Phillip with food and lodging and give him two suits of clothes (one new and worth five pounds and of Phillip’s choice) at the end of the apprenticeship. Thus, by age twenty-one, Martin had a business, a wife, an apprentice, and a legal responsibility. Martin and his wife made their home in Hellam Township, York County, Pa. They eventually had eight children, six of whom survived: Valentine K, David, John R., Jacob, Martin S. and Julia Ann Shultz. It is from Julia Ann that we are descended. Family Moves to Carolina After 1760, the shoe trade was booming in New England. Virginia shipped her tanned leathers there. Martin may have felt a falling off in trade or difficulty in obtaining good leather in PA. Perhaps there was too much competition from New England bootmakers. Whatever the reason, he began planning a move to the Carolinas. He consulted with a number of his neighbors and they agreed to accompany the Shultz’s in their move to this wilderness area even though it was purported to have no doctors. Because of the move, Martin had to go back to court and be relieved of his responsibility for Philip. Rather than just abandon the lad, however, he made arrangements for Philip to be apprenticed to another cordwainer, Daniel Peterman. The new apprenticeship terms were the same as in the original contract between Martin and Philip. By 1764 Martin and Juliana had made all their preparations for the journey and set out with their group of friends and neighbors for Carolina, The group made their way to Mecklenburg County, NC. They settled in an area near Killian’s Creek and Leeper’s Creek or Lick Run which is now the eastern part of Lincoln County, North Carolina. Life in Carolina For the next few years, Martin witnessed a number of deeds for people in the area. Many of these people were those who had come from PA with him. After Tryon County was created from Mecklenburg Co. Martin was made constable by the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions of Tyron County. He was sworn in “on Thursday after the first Tuesday in April, 1770.” These events show that he was respected by the court and his peers. Again for the next few years Martin witnessed a number of deeds for people in the area. He also began buying and selling land himself. By 1777, Martin was identified on the deeds he signed as Doctor Martin Shultz. Apparently between the time he had moved from PA and 1777, he had taken training as a doctor in Mecklenburg (Later Tryon) County, NC. Why he gave up his profession of cordwaining and took up medicine, we don’t know. However, he probably had little if any source of fine leather in NC and the area needed doctors. Some early historians say that there were no doctors in the area. If that is so, Martin was simply filling a need and may have trained himself. From this point on, he seems to be identified as doctor. Another Move Feeling the itch to move again, the Shultz family prepared during the fall and winter of 1777 and 1778 to move to Washington County NC. They arrived there in the summer of 1778 and settled near the Holston River. Again he began buying and selling land. Soon that part of Washington County, NC became Washington County TN. By 1779, Sullivan County, TN was carved out of Washington Co, and the Shultz’s now lived there. Revolutionary War The Revolutionary War was well under way by this time. In fact, Martin may have thought that moving further west might be a way of escaping the war. Martin was caught up in the war, never-the-less. He enlisted in the militia and served as a surgeon under Colonel Shelby and Colonel Campbell. Family tradition says that he was in the Battle of King’s Mountain, and he is listed on the rolls for the battle as a private under John Sevier. King’s Mountain King’s Mountain has two faces. On one hand it was a decisive America victory and changed the tide of the war in the South. On the other hand, it had elements that were shameful and disgraceful. The battle lasted a few minutes over one hour. Every single British soldier was killed, wounded, or captured. The commander of the British forces had boastfully said that if the men from the other side of the mountains didn’t stop crossing the mountains engaging in skirmishes and fights, he would cross the mountains, hang them, and lay waste to their lands. Incensed by the insult, the “Overmountain Men” fought ferociously. (The Overmountain Men made up over fifty percent of the Patriot troops at King’s Mountain, but other Southern colonists were involved, too.) It was a battle in which Americans fought Americans. About the only real professional soldier was the Commander, Colonel Patrick Ferguson. The British “troops” were made up of “a handful of soldiers” but consisted primarily of Loyalists and sympathizers in the region who had been told that if they didn’t fight, the barbaric “Overmountain Men” would slaughter them. (This notice came from the same Colonel Ferguson who had infuriated the Overmountain Men. He seemed to have an insulting way with words.) The Patriot troops marched over the mountains from NE TN and SW VA and met with other men from GA and the Carolinas. They found the British troops atop King’s Mountain, which Ferguson had thought would be a good place to defend. However, the mountain left no way for escape. The colonists surrounded the Loyalists and picked them off each time the British soldiers tried to charge with bayonets. (The Overmountain Men were hunters who were generally crack shots.) Above the battle noise the men could hear a silver whistle that Ferguson was using to direct his troops. The whistling stopped when Ferguson was shot from his horse. The battle lasted a few minutes over one hour. Dead and wounded were lying all over the area. Ferguson’s second in command knew the cause was hopeless and ordered his men to surrender. Official reports say the firing stopped immediately. Diaries, journals, and other firsthand accounts, however, say that that was not the case. After the Battle During an earlier battle, British troops under a Colonel Banister Tarleton had killed colonial soldiers who had been trying to surrender. The colonists, therefore, were in no mood for kindness. They reportedly killed British soldiers at King’s Mountain who were trying to surrender and yelled, “Give them Tarleton’s quarter” as they shot the defeated men. Some early sources say there were no doctors at King’s mountain, but the British had one doctor, a Dr. Uzal Johnson, and the colonists had Dr. Martin Shultz. The problem was—lack of supplies. No medicine, no bandages, no splints—nothing. Reportedly amputations were carried out with whiskey and brute force. Undoubtedly our Dr. Shultz did what he could, but that was precious little. One eyewitness account says that in at least one instance Dr. Johnston was not permitted to administer aid to the British forces.
Casualties, like the battle, were one=sided. Every single person on the British side was either killed or captured. The dead included Colonel Ferguson, who was felled by at least eight shots. On the British side 225 were killed, 163 were wounded, and 715 were taken prisoner. On the colonists’ side 28 were killed and 62 were wounded.
Wounded and dead were left where they fell overnight; then, the next morning those able were marched north to be exchanged. Most of the Patriot troops dwindled away as the men headed back home where they were needed. It has been said that the army “dissolved” as quickly as it had formed. (Modern observers might have called this action deserting, but the Overmountain men, who were almost all volunteers, didn’t look at it that way. They needed to get home to protect their families from the Indian tribes who considered the settlers in their area intruders.) Atrocities Supposedly the untrained patriot soldiers slashed prisoners with swords and hit them with rifle butts as they were marched away. Many of the defeated were “lost” on the march away from the battle. (It is assumed that some were killed; however, a good portion of them probably escaped as the Overmountain Men left the army.) Nine of these who were considered particularly odious were hanged during the next few days. In many respects it was not a glorious moment in American history. End of the Line Martin Shultz left with the other Overmountain Men and made his way back to TN. The land where he lived continued to go through the name changes that so many places during that time did. When he died in the fall of 1787, his home was in Sullivan County, State of Franklin. He was 47 years old. Juliana, Dr. Shultz’s wife, outlined him by several years. After his death, she moved from Sullivan County to Emert’s Cove (Pittman Center) in Sevier County. Her son Martin Shultz, Jr., lived there, as did her daughter Julia Ann who had married Richard Reagan. Julia Ann was the mother of Daniel Wesley Reagan.
Dr. Martin Shultz did not live a long life, but he contributed to his family, community, and country. He could be relied on to do what was right and what needed to be done.
Connection to Battle of Kings Mountain
Johan Martin Schultz went by the name of Dr. Martin Schultz and was quite possibly the only Patriot doctor present at the Battle of Kings Mountain. He was a member of “the Overmountain Men” (see source below) and served as a surgeon at the Battle of Kings Mountain under Col. Shelby and Campbell. Based on family history handed down from the Franklin lineage, Aaron Franklin fought and died at the Battle of Kings Mountain. Could it be possible (probable) that Dr. Martin Schultz attended to the medical needs of Aaron Franklin at the Battle of Kings Mountain? John Crockett, father to Davy Crockett also served alongside Dr. Schultz at the Battle of Kings Mountain.
Source: Alderman, The Overmountain Men-Early Tennessee History 1760-1765 [by Pat Alder] (p 127)
Service: NC Rev War Pay Vouchers, Seimes NC 68.61 Frame 339. Paid for services rendered; Battle of Kings Mountain, 1780.
Source: Early History of Dr. Martin Shultz & Julianna Stenz by Donald B. Reagan, Copyright 1989



OVERMOUNTAIN MEN
Overmountain men were men who lived West of the Appalachian Moutains in what is now Tennessee. At the time, it was considered to be territory of North Carolina. “Backwater people” was another term applied to this group of people. The “backwater” areas were those in which the water flowed to the Mississippi, i.e. on the other side of the mountains.

“Their “low, lazy, sluttish, heathenish, hellish life” shocked one Anglican missionary sent over the mountains in 1766 to convert them. He had particular difficulty averting his eyes from the “young women,” who had “a most uncommon practice, which I cannot break them of. They draw their shift as tight as possible to the body and pin it close to shew [sic] the roundness of their breasts and slender waists (for they are generally finely shaped) and draw their petticoat close to their hips to shew the fineness of their limbs.””
source: http://www.historynet.com/the-overmountain-men-battle-for-the-carolinas.htm

Battle of King’s Mountain:
“This battle—fought by 1,000 plus militiamen—without orders, formal military training, uniforms or provisions, and with no promise of pay—against the supposedly “superior forces” of noted English Col. Patrick Ferguson—is credited by most early historians with having changed the course of the Revolution in the South”
source: http://www.tngenweb.org/revwar/kingsmountain.html
Links:
Overmountain Men at the Battle of King’s Mountain:
http://www.historynet.com/the-overmountain-men-battle-for-the-carolinas.htm
http://wncmagazine.com/feature/history/the_long_road_to_victory
http://www.tngenweb.org/revwar/kingsmountain.html
Relationship to me

Dr. Johann “John” Martin Shultz (1740 – 1788)
5th great-grandfather
Julia Ann Shultz (1775 – 1845)
Daughter of Dr. Johann “John” Martin Shultz
Daniel Wesley Reagan (1803 – 1892)
Son of Julia Ann Shultz
Richard Reason Reagan (1830 – 1912)
Son of Daniel Wesley Reagan
Nancy Elizabeth Reagan (1849 – 1931)
Daughter of Richard Reason Reagan
Martha Elizabeth Abbott/Whitaker/Goode (1872 – 1911)
Daughter of Nancy Elizabeth Reagan
Ben Cates Goode (1909 – 1980)
Son of Martha Elizabeth Abbott/Whitaker/Goode
Evelyn Deloris Goode
You are the daughter of Ben Cates Goode

Capt. Christopher Clark 4th Great Grandfather


CHRISTOPHER cLARK

Descendants of Christopher Clark
>
>
> Generation No. 1
>
> 1. CAPT. CHRISTOPHER1 CLARK was born 1698, and died 1754 in Louisa Co.,
> Virginia. He married PENELOPE BOLLING, daughter of JOHN BOLLING and MARY
> KENNON.
>
> Notes for CAPT. CHRISTOPHER CLARK:
>
> Christopher Clark was justice of the first bench of magistrates of Louisa
> Co., VA, established December 13, 1742, formed of Col. Robert Lewis, Capt.
> Christopher Clark, Thomas Meriwether and others. (Records of Louisa Co.,
> VA. Order Book 1, Page 1.)
>
> He was law partner of Nicholas Meriwether (ancestor of Meriwether Lewis).
> He was a wealthy man for that time. Land records show purchase of lands in
> Hanover Co., VA on Cedar Creek in 1705-06. It is also stated that he
bought
> large tracts in 1702-05 with Nicholas Meriwether. Hanover Co. Records show
> patents of thousands of acres to him from 1722 to 1739, prior to the
> formation of Louisa County from Hanover in 1742. In 1730, he with Nicholas
> Meriwether patented 17, 952 acres (Records in land office at Richmond,
VA.,
> State Library, Archives Division.)
>
> Christopher Clark’s home was at Green Springs, Louisa, Co., Va on part of
a
> rich body of land supposed to be the former bed of a lake. From there he
> cut a road to his lands in Albemarle Co., near present Charlottesville,
> which was called “Clark’s Trace” or Track” and is so called on old maps to
> this day. He was a tobacco planter and owned slaves. He is called Captain
> of the House of Burgesses, and father of Micajah Clark, Sr., (From VA.
Mag.
> VI 277)
>
> In the will of Nicholas Meriwether, dated December 12, 1743, he is called
> Captain Christopher Clark and was undoubtedly Captain of VA mounted
Troops,
> as evidenced by the following: In the year book of the Society of Colonial
> Wars, P. 41, Roll of Ancestors: Captain Christopher Clarke, Virginia, born
> in Virginia, died in VA 1753. Captain of Militia, Hanover CO., VA. 1727″.
> In his will, dated August 14, 1741, Proved May 28, 1754, Louisa Co., VA.,
> Christopher Clark bequeathed to his son Bowling, his trooping arms, his
law
> books and his “great Bible”. This “great Bible” bequeathed to Bowling was
> carried into Georgia and later was lost. This, with the subsequent loss of
> the Bible of his son Micajah, which it is said had the “Records copied
form
> his father’s “great Bible” prevents the certain tracing of Captain
> Christopher Clark’s ancestors. Christopher Clark married Penelope Bolling,
> daughter of Major John Bolling and his wife, Mary Kennon Bolling.
> Reference: Daughters of the American Revolution Magazine, June 1926
>
> !Captain Christopher Clark of Hanover and Louisa Counties, VA was a
lawyer,
> soldier, public official and the progenitor of an illustrious family which
in
> succeeding generations spread throughout the United States. He died in
> Virginia and his will was probated 28 May 1754 in Louisa Co., VA. He had
two
> grandsons as governors during the same period – Governor James C. Clark of
> Kentucky, 1836 and Governor Charles Lynch of Mississippi, 1836. Among
other
> distfinguished descendants of Christopher and Penelope (Bolling) Clark
are:
> !Charles Lynch, Rev. Sol.; Major Robert Clark, Rev. Sol, and father of
Gov.
> James G. Clark of Ky., who estafblished the first iron foundry in
Kentucky;
> Bennett Clark, Sr. and Bennett Clark, Jr., both Generals in the
Confederate
> Army and members of Congress; and Dr. Milton Anthony who founded the
Georgia
> Medical College at August, Georgia.
> !Christopher was a large land owner in Louisa Co. and obtained land grants
in
> Albemarle Co. in 1732 (VA History Magazine). He was Overseer of Friends
> Meeting House near Sowest Mtn. His sons Edward and Bolling were also
> Overseers
> of Friends Meeting House.
> !The abstracts on the genealogy of this family were taken from “My
Ancestors
> and Descendants, by Carl E. Smith, 1967, privately printed at Tampa,
> Florida by
> Rinaldi Printing Co. and also from “Early Clark-Clarke Clues” Compiled and
> Published by Harry D. Roberts, 29500 Heathercliff Rd., 168, Malibu
California
> 90265.
>
>
> More About CAPT. CHRISTOPHER CLARK:
> Name 2: Christopher (Capt) Clark
> Date born 2: 1681, ENGLAND
> Died 2: 1753, ALBERMARLE COUNTY, VIRGINIA
>
> Notes for PENELOPE BOLLING:
> of Import: May 20, 2001 & Apr 29, 1996]
>
> !On a genealogical page of the Atlanta “Sunday American” dated June 22
1930, we
> have the following: “Christopher Clark’s wife Penelope Bolling, daughter
of
> Major John Bolling and his wife Mary Kennon Bolling. Reference, Daughters
of
> the American Revolution Magazine, June 1926, p. 364-5
> !Penelope Bolling was not mentioned in her father’s will, not unusual,.
> probably
> received her share at time of her marriage
>
>
> Children of CHRISTOPHER CLARK and PENELOPE BOLLING are:
> i. EDWARD2 CLARK, b. 1710; d.; m. ANN PAULETTE
> ii. AGNES CLARK, b. 1712; d. 1754; m. BENJAMIN JOHNSON, 1728;
> !Son of William Johnson of Scotland
>
> More About BENJAMIN JOHNSON:
>
> 2. iii. RACHEL CLARK, b. 1714; d. 1792.
> iv. SARAH CLARK, b. 1716;; m. CHARLES LYNCH,
> v. BOWLING CLARK, b. 1717; m. BURFORD WINEFRED,.
> 3. vi. MICAJAH CLARK, b. September 16, 1718, Hanover Co.,
> Virginia; d. 1809, Albemarle Co., Virginia.
> vii. BOLLING/BOWLING CLARK, b. 1720; d. m. BURFORD WINEFRED,
> viii. ELIZABETH CLARK, b. February 15, 1720/21;
>
> Generation No. 2
>
> 2. RACHEL2 CLARK (CHRISTOPHER1) was born 1714, and died 1792. She
married
> THOMAS MOORMAN January 12, 1729/30.
> More About RACHEL CLARK:
> Date born 2: 1714, LOUISA COUNTY, VIRGINIA
> Died 2: June 10, 1792
>
> More About THOMAS MOORMAN:
> Date born 2: September 14, 1705
> Died 2: 1765, BEDFORD COUTNY, VIRGINIA
>
> Children of RACHEL CLARK and THOMAS MOORMAN are:
> i. ROBERT3 MOORMAN,; m. DOROTHY,
> ii. MARY MOORMAN, b. December 19, 1730; (1) BENJAMIN JOHNSON,; m. (2)
> JOHN MILLER,
> iii. ZACHARIAH MOORMAN, b. February 02, 1731/32;; m. (1)
> ELIZABETH TERRELL, m. (2) BETTY JOHNSON,.
> iv. CLARK TERRELL MOORMAN, b. 1734; dm. RACHEL HARRIS,
> v. MICAJAH CLARK MOORMAN, b. June 28, 1735; d. 1806; m.
> SUSANNAH CHILES,.
> vi. RACHEL CLARK MOORMAN, b. 1737;; m. STEPHEN GOGGINS,
> vii. ELIZABETH MOORMAN, b. February 02, 1737/38;
> viii. MILDRED MOORMAN, b. November 25, 1742; m. JAMES JOHNSON,.
> ix. ANDREW MOORMAN, b. 1743; m. (1) MOLLY GILL, m. (2)
> PRUDENCE GOODE ANDERSON.
> x. ACHILLES MOORMAN, b. 1744; m. FRANCES HERNDON,.
> xi. PLEASANT MOORMAN, b. 1745;
> xii. CHARLES MOORMAN, b. 1747; m. (1) REBECCA LEFTWICH, m. (2)
> NANCY HANCOCK,.
> xiii. AGATHA MOORMAN, b. 1749; d.; m. WILLIAM JOHNSON,.
>
>
>
> 3. MICAJAH2 CLARK (CHRISTOPHER1) was born September 16, 1718 in Hanover
> Co., Virginia, and died 1809 in Albemarle Co., Virginia. He married
JUDITH
> ADAMS October 1735 in Bedford, Amherst, Virginia. She was born October
> 1716, and died Aft. 1782.
>
> !Micajah Clark was a Revolutionary Soldier, as was his son Christopher
> Clark II.
> !The abstracts on the genealogy of this Clark family were taken from “My
> Ancestors and Descendants” by Carl B. Smith, 1967, printed at Tampa,
Florida
> by Rinaldi Printing Co., and “Early Clark-Clarke Clues, Compiled and
Published
> by Harry D. Roberts 29500 Heathercliff Road, 168 Malibu, CA 90265.
> !Micajah Clark, Sr., was the 5th child of Christopher and Penelope
(Bolling)
> Clark. Like his father, he was a large land owner and gave land to each
of
> his
> 12 children. He was well educated, as were all his childrfen. He was a
> surveyor and located two tracts of land in Bedford Co. for his friend,
Thomas
> Jefferson. He liked this land around the Peaks of Otters so much, he
bought
> three tracts which he gave to his sons, Christopher, Robert and one other.
A
> grandson said he built a small church near his home that was open to all
sects
> every Sunday. If no minister came, he would conduct a service. He was
called
> the “Quaker Preacher”. Most of the children joined the Society of Friends
but
> he did not join. When asked why he didn’t join some denomination, he
replied
> that he did not agree with any one of them entirely in doctrine or church
> government; that there was “good in all, but none all good” and he would
trust
> in the Mercy of his Savior and try to live up to his creed which was: “Do
all
> the good you can, avoid all the evil you can, trust and believe in God.
Man
> knows nothing.”
> Alexander Brown, in “Cabells and Their Kin’ says the Clarks were the first
> settlers of Albemarle, once part of Hanover, afterwards Louisa and the
records
> of the period in which it was one of the most prominent familes
(1748-1763)
> were lost–disappearing at the time of Tarleton’s raid and supposed to
have
> been destroyed by the British troops who took possession of the Court
House.
> Descendants have for many years hunted for Micajah’s Bible as they have
for
> the Great Bible of his father. It went to his namesake, Micajah, Jr., but
> cannot be traced. The list of the children of Macajah Clark, Sr. and wife
> Judith Adams, was taken from the family Bible in 1832 by Samuel T.
Moorman.
> In his own hand writing he states: “This memorandum I copied from the old
> family Bible of Micajah Clark.
> Also referred to “History of Albemarle Co.” by Woods for information.
>
>
>
> !Judith’s second husband was Mr. Oglesby.
> Her father was Col. Robert Adams.
> Her mother was Mourning Lewis.
>
>
> Children of MICAJAH CLARK and JUDITH ADAMS are:
> i. WILLIAM3 CLARK, b. Aft. 1735; m. JUDITH WOODSON CREEDLE.
>
> ii. CHRISTOPHER CLARK, b. February 20, 1736/37, Amherst; m.
> MILLICENT MILDRED TERRELL, March 13, 1757;.
>
> !Christropher Clark married Millicent Terrell 13 Mar. 1757. She was the
> daughter of David Terrell, Sr. and Agatha Chiles.
>
> iii. ROBERT CLARK, b. August 13, 1738; d. m. SUSAN HENDERSON,
> !Robert Clark married Susan Henderson, daughter of John Henderson, Sr.
> They moved to Bedford Co. and then to Clarke Co. KY and had 17 children.
> He was the first manufacturer of iron in Kentucky.
>
> iv. MOURNING CLARK, b. April 06, 1740;
>
> Notes for MOURNING CLARK:
> Mourning died unmarried.
>
> v. MICAJAH CLARK, b. February 27, 1740/41; m. MILDRED
MARTIN,
> February 21, 1776;
>
> vi. JOHN CLARK, b. December 26, 1743; m. MARY MOORE, b.
> January 12, 1747/48, Albemarle Co., Virginia; d. November 05, 1830.
> !Capt. John C.. Clark, Rev. Sol. served in the Revolutionay War in the 8th
> Regiment and was granted Virginia land for his service. He was the father
of
> Mary Moore Clark who married her cousin, David Clark.
>
> vii. EDWARD CLARK, b. December 17, 1745;.
> Edward died single
>
>
>
> 4. viii. PENELOPE CLARK, b. October 07, 1747, Albemarle Co.,
Louisa,
> Bedford Co.;
> ix. JUDITH CLARK, b. December 02, 1749; m. ANDREW MOORMAN,
> x. BOLLING CLARK, b. December 04, 1751; d. December 04,
1818;
> m. ELIZABETH CREEDLE.
>
> xi. ELIZABETH BETTY CLARK, b. January 14, 1754; JOSEPH
> ANTHONY, SR.,
>
> xii. JAMES CLARK, b. January 16, 1757; m. LUCY CREEDLE,
> 5. xiii. CRISTOPHER CLARK, b. April 20, 1737, AMHERST COUNTY,
VIRGINIA;
> d. WFT Est. 1738-1827.
> 6. xiv. ROBERT CLARK, b. August 15, 1738, ALBERMARLE COUNTY,
> VIRGINIA; d. April 10, 1810, CLARK COUNTY, KENTUCKY.
> xv. JOHN CLARK, b. December 26, 1745; d. m. MARY MOORE, b.
> January 12, 1747/48, Albemarle Co., Virginia; d. November 05, 1830.
>
> xvi. WILLIAM CLARK, b. September 04, 1782, ALBERMARLE COUNTY,
> VIRGINIA; d. October 27, 1800; m. JUDITH WOODSON CREEDLE,.
• Generation details
Posted 14 Sep 2015 by EvelynMiller1939
Descendants of Christopher Clark
>
>
> Generation No. 1
>
> 1. CAPT. CHRISTOPHER1 CLARK was born 1698, and died 1754 in Louisa Co.,
> Virginia. He married PENELOPE BOLLING, daughter of JOHN BOLLING and MARY
> KENNON.
>
> Notes for CAPT. CHRISTOPHER CLARK:
>
> Christopher Clark was justice of the first bench of magistrates of Louisa
> Co., VA, established December 13, 1742, formed of Col. Robert Lewis, Capt.
> Christopher Clark, Thomas Meriwether and others. (Records of Louisa Co.,
> VA. Order Book 1, Page 1.)
>
> He was law partner of Nicholas Meriwether (ancestor of Meriwether Lewis).
> He was a wealthy man for that time. Land records show purchase of lands in
> Hanover Co., VA on Cedar Creek in 1705-06. It is also stated that he
bought
> large tracts in 1702-05 with Nicholas Meriwether. Hanover Co. Records show
> patents of thousands of acres to him from 1722 to 1739, prior to the
> formation of Louisa County from Hanover in 1742. In 1730, he with Nicholas
> Meriwether patented 17, 952 acres (Records in land office at Richmond,
VA.,
> State Library, Archives Division.)
>
> Christopher Clark’s home was at Green Springs, Louisa, Co., Va on part of
a
> rich body of land supposed to be the former bed of a lake. From there he
> cut a road to his lands in Albemarle Co., near present Charlottesville,
> which was called “Clark’s Trace” or Track” and is so called on old maps to
> this day. He was a tobacco planter and owned slaves. He is called Captain
> of the House of Burgesses, and father of Micajah Clark, Sr., (From VA.
Mag.
> VI 277)
>
> In the will of Nicholas Meriwether, dated December 12, 1743, he is called
> Captain Christopher Clark and was undoubtedly Captain of VA mounted
Troops,
> as evidenced by the following: In the year book of the Society of Colonial
> Wars, P. 41, Roll of Ancestors: Captain Christopher Clarke, Virginia, born
> in Virginia, died in VA 1753. Captain of Militia, Hanover CO., VA. 1727″.
> In his will, dated August 14, 1741, Proved May 28, 1754, Louisa Co., VA.,
> Christopher Clark bequeathed to his son Bowling, his trooping arms, his
law
> books and his “great Bible”. This “great Bible” bequeathed to Bowling was
> carried into Georgia and later was lost. This, with the subsequent loss of
> the Bible of his son Micajah, which it is said had the “Records copied
form
> his father’s “great Bible” prevents the certain tracing of Captain
> Christopher Clark’s ancestors. Christopher Clark married Penelope Bolling,
> daughter of Major John Bolling and his wife, Mary Kennon Bolling.
> Reference: Daughters of the American Revolution Magazine, June 1926
>
> !Captain Christopher Clark of Hanover and Louisa Counties, VA was a
lawyer,
> soldier, public official and the progenitor of an illustrious family which
in
> succeeding generations spread throughout the United States. He died in
> Virginia and his will was probated 28 May 1754 in Louisa Co., VA. He had
two
> grandsons as governors during the same period – Governor James C. Clark of
> Kentucky, 1836 and Governor Charles Lynch of Mississippi, 1836. Among
other
> distfinguished descendants of Christopher and Penelope (Bolling) Clark
are:
> !Charles Lynch, Rev. Sol.; Major Robert Clark, Rev. Sol, and father of
Gov.
> James G. Clark of Ky., who estafblished the first iron foundry in
Kentucky;
> Bennett Clark, Sr. and Bennett Clark, Jr., both Generals in the
Confederate
> Army and members of Congress; and Dr. Milton Anthony who founded the
Georgia
> Medical College at August, Georgia.
> !Christopher was a large land owner in Louisa Co. and obtained land grants
in
> Albemarle Co. in 1732 (VA History Magazine). He was Overseer of Friends
> Meeting House near Sowest Mtn. His sons Edward and Bolling were also
> Overseers
> of Friends Meeting House.
> !The abstracts on the genealogy of this family were taken from “My
Ancestors
> and Descendants, by Carl E. Smith, 1967, privately printed at Tampa,
> Florida by
> Rinaldi Printing Co. and also from “Early Clark-Clarke Clues” Compiled and
> Published by Harry D. Roberts, 29500 Heathercliff Rd., 168, Malibu
California
> 90265.
>
>
> More About CAPT. CHRISTOPHER CLARK:
> Name 2: Christopher (Capt) Clark
> Date born 2: 1681, ENGLAND
> Died 2: 1753, ALBERMARLE COUNTY, VIRGINIA
>
> Notes for PENELOPE BOLLING:
> of Import: May 20, 2001 & Apr 29, 1996]
>
> !On a genealogical page of the Atlanta “Sunday American” dated June 22
1930, we
> have the following: “Christopher Clark’s wife Penelope Bolling, daughter
of
> Major John Bolling and his wife Mary Kennon Bolling. Reference, Daughters
of
> the American Revolution Magazine, June 1926, p. 364-5
> !Penelope Bolling was not mentioned in her father’s will, not unusual,.
> probably
> received her share at time of her marriage
>
>
> Children of CHRISTOPHER CLARK and PENELOPE BOLLING are:
> i. EDWARD2 CLARK, b. 1710; d.; m. ANN PAULETTE
> ii. AGNES CLARK, b. 1712; d. 1754; m. BENJAMIN JOHNSON, 1728;
> !Son of William Johnson of Scotland
>
> More About BENJAMIN JOHNSON:
>
> 2. iii. RACHEL CLARK, b. 1714; d. 1792.
> iv. SARAH CLARK, b. 1716;; m. CHARLES LYNCH,
> v. BOWLING CLARK, b. 1717; m. BURFORD WINEFRED,.
> 3. vi. MICAJAH CLARK, b. September 16, 1718, Hanover Co.,
> Virginia; d. 1809, Albemarle Co., Virginia.
> vii. BOLLING/BOWLING CLARK, b. 1720; d. m. BURFORD WINEFRED,
> viii. ELIZABETH CLARK, b. February 15, 1720/21;
>
> Generation No. 2
>
> 2. RACHEL2 CLARK (CHRISTOPHER1) was born 1714, and died 1792. She
married
> THOMAS MOORMAN January 12, 1729/30.
> More About RACHEL CLARK:
> Date born 2: 1714, LOUISA COUNTY, VIRGINIA
> Died 2: June 10, 1792
>
> More About THOMAS MOORMAN:
> Date born 2: September 14, 1705
> Died 2: 1765, BEDFORD COUTNY, VIRGINIA
>
> Children of RACHEL CLARK and THOMAS MOORMAN are:
> i. ROBERT3 MOORMAN,; m. DOROTHY,
> ii. MARY MOORMAN, b. December 19, 1730; (1) BENJAMIN JOHNSON,; m. (2)
> JOHN MILLER,
> iii. ZACHARIAH MOORMAN, b. February 02, 1731/32;; m. (1)
> ELIZABETH TERRELL, m. (2) BETTY JOHNSON,.
> iv. CLARK TERRELL MOORMAN, b. 1734; dm. RACHEL HARRIS,
> v. MICAJAH CLARK MOORMAN, b. June 28, 1735; d. 1806; m.
> SUSANNAH CHILES,.
> vi. RACHEL CLARK MOORMAN, b. 1737;; m. STEPHEN GOGGINS,
> vii. ELIZABETH MOORMAN, b. February 02, 1737/38;
> viii. MILDRED MOORMAN, b. November 25, 1742; m. JAMES JOHNSON,.
> ix. ANDREW MOORMAN, b. 1743; m. (1) MOLLY GILL, m. (2)
> PRUDENCE GOODE ANDERSON.
> x. ACHILLES MOORMAN, b. 1744; m. FRANCES HERNDON,.
> xi. PLEASANT MOORMAN, b. 1745;
> xii. CHARLES MOORMAN, b. 1747; m. (1) REBECCA LEFTWICH, m. (2)
> NANCY HANCOCK,.
> xiii. AGATHA MOORMAN, b. 1749; d.; m. WILLIAM JOHNSON,.
>
>
>
> 3. MICAJAH2 CLARK (CHRISTOPHER1) was born September 16, 1718 in Hanover
> Co., Virginia, and died 1809 in Albemarle Co., Virginia. He married
JUDITH
> ADAMS October 1735 in Bedford, Amherst, Virginia. She was born October
> 1716, and died Aft. 1782.
>
> !Micajah Clark was a Revolutionary Soldier, as was his son Christopher
> Clark II.
> !The abstracts on the genealogy of this Clark family were taken from “My
> Ancestors and Descendants” by Carl B. Smith, 1967, printed at Tampa,
Florida
> by Rinaldi Printing Co., and “Early Clark-Clarke Clues, Compiled and
Published
> by Harry D. Roberts 29500 Heathercliff Road, 168 Malibu, CA 90265.
> !Micajah Clark, Sr., was the 5th child of Christopher and Penelope
(Bolling)
> Clark. Like his father, he was a large land owner and gave land to each
of
> his
> 12 children. He was well educated, as were all his childrfen. He was a
> surveyor and located two tracts of land in Bedford Co. for his friend,
Thomas
> Jefferson. He liked this land around the Peaks of Otters so much, he
bought
> three tracts which he gave to his sons, Christopher, Robert and one other.
A
> grandson said he built a small church near his home that was open to all
sects
> every Sunday. If no minister came, he would conduct a service. He was
called
> the “Quaker Preacher”. Most of the children joined the Society of Friends
but
> he did not join. When asked why he didn’t join some denomination, he
replied
> that he did not agree with any one of them entirely in doctrine or church
> government; that there was “good in all, but none all good” and he would
trust
> in the Mercy of his Savior and try to live up to his creed which was: “Do
all
> the good you can, avoid all the evil you can, trust and believe in God.
Man
> knows nothing.”
> Alexander Brown, in “Cabells and Their Kin’ says the Clarks were the first
> settlers of Albemarle, once part of Hanover, afterwards Louisa and the
records
> of the period in which it was one of the most prominent familes
(1748-1763)
> were lost–disappearing at the time of Tarleton’s raid and supposed to
have
> been destroyed by the British troops who took possession of the Court
House.
> Descendants have for many years hunted for Micajah’s Bible as they have
for
> the Great Bible of his father. It went to his namesake, Micajah, Jr., but
> cannot be traced. The list of the children of Macajah Clark, Sr. and wife
> Judith Adams, was taken from the family Bible in 1832 by Samuel T.
Moorman.
> In his own hand writing he states: “This memorandum I copied from the old
> family Bible of Micajah Clark.
> Also referred to “History of Albemarle Co.” by Woods for information.
>
>
>
> !Judith’s second husband was Mr. Oglesby.
> Her father was Col. Robert Adams.
> Her mother was Mourning Lewis.
>
>
> Children of MICAJAH CLARK and JUDITH ADAMS are:
> i. WILLIAM3 CLARK, b. Aft. 1735; m. JUDITH WOODSON CREEDLE.
>
> ii. CHRISTOPHER CLARK, b. February 20, 1736/37, Amherst; m.
> MILLICENT MILDRED TERRELL, March 13, 1757;.
>
> !Christropher Clark married Millicent Terrell 13 Mar. 1757. She was the
> daughter of David Terrell, Sr. and Agatha Chiles.
>
> iii. ROBERT CLARK, b. August 13, 1738; d. m. SUSAN HENDERSON,
> !Robert Clark married Susan Henderson, daughter of John Henderson, Sr.
> They moved to Bedford Co. and then to Clarke Co. KY and had 17 children.
> He was the first manufacturer of iron in Kentucky.
>
> iv. MOURNING CLARK, b. April 06, 1740;
>
> Notes for MOURNING CLARK:
> Mourning died unmarried.
>
> v. MICAJAH CLARK, b. February 27, 1740/41; m. MILDRED
MARTIN,
> February 21, 1776;
>
> vi. JOHN CLARK, b. December 26, 1743; m. MARY MOORE, b.
> January 12, 1747/48, Albemarle Co., Virginia; d. November 05, 1830.
> !Capt. John C.. Clark, Rev. Sol. served in the Revolutionay War in the 8th
> Regiment and was granted Virginia land for his service. He was the father
of
> Mary Moore Clark who married her cousin, David Clark.
>
> vii. EDWARD CLARK, b. December 17, 1745;.
> Edward died single
>
>
>
> 4. viii. PENELOPE CLARK, b. October 07, 1747, Albemarle Co.,
Louisa,
> Bedford Co.;
> ix. JUDITH CLARK, b. December 02, 1749; m. ANDREW MOORMAN,
> x. BOLLING CLARK, b. December 04, 1751; d. December 04,
1818;
> m. ELIZABETH CREEDLE.
>
> xi. ELIZABETH BETTY CLARK, b. January 14, 1754; JOSEPH
> ANTHONY, SR.,
>
> xii. JAMES CLARK, b. January 16, 1757; m. LUCY CREEDLE,
> 5. xiii. CRISTOPHER CLARK, b. April 20, 1737, AMHERST COUNTY,
VIRGINIA;
> d. WFT Est. 1738-1827.
> 6. xiv. ROBERT CLARK, b. August 15, 1738, ALBERMARLE COUNTY,
> VIRGINIA; d. April 10, 1810, CLARK COUNTY, KENTUCKY.
> xv. JOHN CLARK, b. December 26, 1745; d. m. MARY MOORE, b.
> January 12, 1747/48, Albemarle Co., Virginia; d. November 05, 1830.
>
> xvi. WILLIAM CLARK, b. September 04, 1782, ALBERMARLE COUNTY,
> VIRGINIA; d. October 27, 1800; m. JUDITH WOODSON CREEDLE,.
n Arundle Co, Md. Philip was employed as in Farmer. He resided 6 in “Portland Manor”, West River, Anne Arundel Co., Md.
Cassandra Skipwith Lady [Parents] was born 1 on 29 Oct 1678 in “Silverstone”, West River, Ann Arundle Co., Md. She died in 1746 in “Stone Hill”, Harford Co., Md. She was buried in 1746 in West River Mtg., Ann ArundleCo., Md. She married 2, 3, 4, 5 Philip Coale on 6 Apr 1697 in Home of George Skipwith, “Silverstone “, Ann Arundle Co, Md. She signed a will 6on 13 May 1746 in Probated, Baltimore Co., Md.
They had the following children:
FiCassandra Coale FiiMary Elizabeth Coale FiiiAnn Coale MivSkipwith Coale Capt. MvWilliam Coale

Christopher Clark Sr (1737 – 1805)
4th great-grandfather

Mourning Clark Key (1764 – 1840)
daughter of Christopher Clark Sr

Margaret Key (1794 – 1880)
daughter of Mourning Clark Key

Joshua Goode (1828 – )
son of Margaret Key

Charles K Goode (1877 – 1946)
son of Joshua Goode

Ben Cates Goode (1909 – 1980)
son of Charles K Goode

Evelyn Deloris Goode
You are the daughter of Ben Cates Goode

John Key 4th Great Grandfather


key-coat-of-arms-family-crest-2
John_ii2 Key (John_i1) was born in Amherst, Virginia 1710. He married Susannah Watts about 1730. Key and Allied Families by Lane page 177. Virginia Genealogist article by Marcus M. Key M.D. Bedford County, Virginia Marriage Records Family Group Sheet submitted by Emma E. Armstrong 54 South 6 East Salt Lake City, Utah University Stake 12th Ward. Virginia Genealogist Volume 18 Number 1 Page 11 The first known residence of John Key, Jr., in old Amherst County was in Lackey’s Thoroughfare, on a branch of Davis Creek. He bought 71 acres there in 1764 from Henry Key, who was identified as his brotheer, and added to it by patents in 1765. Amherst Virginia Deed Book A page 223. Patent Book 36 page 839-840. Joun Key, Jr. and James Lackey were ordered to survey for anew road in the area in 1766. Amherst County, Virginia Order Book 1766-1769 page 14. In 1770 he sold the remainder of this land in Lakcey’s Thoroughfare to John Craighead of Amherst County and bought 59 acres on the south side of Findlay Mountain near the Glades. Deed Book C page 35 37. William Hansbrough, John Key, Jr., and others from this area were ordered to survey for a new road in 1774, and in 1776 there was a referecnce to John Key’s lines near Purgatory Swamp (below Findley Gap). Deed Book D page 337 Deed Book C page 55. John Key Jr was appointed surveyor of the road from Findlay MOuntain across the Glades to Swan Creek Mountain. Order Book 1773-1782 page 187. In November 1777 John and Agnes Key Jr sold their land (Deed Book D page 463) and probably moved to Bedford County soon thereafter, because in 1778 John Ken Jr was replaced as a road surveyor. (Order Book 1773-1782 page 217) The first tax record of John Key (Jr No longer used) in Bedford County in 1782, for six slaves and 427 acres acres, location unknown. Bedford County Personal property and land tax list) In 1783 he purchased 440 acres on the Staunton (upper Roanoke) River in Bedford County, probably near Hales’s Ford Which he and his wife sold to John Hook of Franklin County in 1788. Deed Book 8 page 110. Augusta County Virginia Deed Book page 129 21 Nov 1772 John Keys and Agnes to Walter Smiley Smelly on West side of South River a branch of James River delivered land to Mr Smiley 10 Feb 178. The Virginia Genealogist page 98 The first record of John Key Senior in Amherst County was in 1768, when Henry Key undertook (acted as surety) for him in a lawsuit. Also in 1768, he deeded his personal estate to his present wife Susannah, and her children, which indicated that he had been married previously. Amherst County records show that John Key Senior and the witnesses to his 1768 deed poll were closely associated with Henry Key and John Key, Junior. One of the witnesses William Hansbrough, lived near Henry Key John Key Jr and James Nevill in the Glades of old Amherst County and was the father in law of William Key, a witness with Henry Key and John Key, Jr. to Amherst County deeds in 1770 and 1772. John Rees, the other witness, also lived in this area and in 1767-1768 when he was involved in a lawsuit, Henry undertook for him. The last record of John Key Senior was in 1769 when he initiated a lawsuit in Amherst County Chancery Court. Susannah Key paid taxes on 100 acres in Amherst County in 1783 and 1785 as the head of a family of nine and in the personal property tax list for the Amerhst District corresponding to what is Now Nelson County) of Amherst County, for zero to two and later zero white males between 1782 and 1802. The personal property tax lists for 1788 and 1794 show that she was the mother of Dabney and Thomas. Dabney was probably born about 1767, based on first in the “over 21” column of the tax lists. Susannah Key’s maiden name is said to have been Watts possible the Watts family of Spotsylvania and Albemarle counties, which has many gaps in its genealogy Edward Watts (ca 1675-1750 patented land in St George’s Parish, Spotsylvania County in 1728 andlieft issue: Thomas (1695-1749) Edward ca 1698-1760, David 1702-1767, William 1704-1760 and John 1710=1765. from Charles B Heinemann, Watts Families Descended from early immigrants who settled in the Tidewater area or Virginia. David was a neighbor of John Key Senior of Albemarel County and owned adjoining land in that part of Louisa County which became Albemarle in 1761. Edward Watts was involved ina lawsuit with John Peartree Burks, Robert Davis and Samuel Jordan all Cabell in laws. Amherst County, Virginia Marriage Records John Key Belinda Milstred 15 Jul 1757 Father Martin Key Daughter of Elizabeth Martin Key Jr Not Named 17 Dec 1773 Thomas Key Frances Garrat(Spinster) May 4, 1773 William Waller Key Elizabeth Alford 20 Dec 1790 John Clements Jane Mills Key 20 Auy 1787 (Consent of father Martin Key) James Letcher Milly Key 6 Jan 1771 Father Henry Key John_ii Key and Susannah Watts had the following children: + 6 i. John Iii3 Key was born about 1731. 7 ii. George Key was born in Of Albemarle, Va about 1732. 8 iii. Judith Key was born in Of Albemarle, Va about 1733. 9 iv. Joseph Key was born in Of Albemarle, Va about 1734. 10 v. Price Key was born in , Va 1735. 11 vi. Barbara Ann Key was born in Of Albemarle, Va about 1736. 12 vii. Mildred Key was born in Of Albemarle, Va about 1738. 13 viii. William Waller Key was born in Of Albemarle, Va about 1739. He married Elizabeth Alford in Amherst, Va, December 20, 1790. 14 ix. Elizabeth Key was born in Of Albemarle, Va about 1742. 15 x. Martin Key was born in Of Albemarle, Va about 174

Description of John Key posted on Ancestry by descendant Gene Key
The description given of John Key Born 1696 who married Martha Tandy. This was found in his Revolutionary War Records — “John Key was 6’6″ tall, thin, red complexion and had a Queer Looking Face.” Of course, the word queer had a different meaning back in his day — he just looked different. And, John Key perhaps has more descendents than just about any other Colonial Virginia Key. – Gene Key [10]

Present day “Key West.” This home was built on the site of “Key West” of 1732 which was the home of John and Martha Tandy Key. It is on the banks of the Rivanna River in Charlottesville, Virginia at 405 Key West Drive.

Key West

Chiminey on Key Land pre 1930
John Key Obit

John Key (1696 – 1765)
5th great-grandfather

Martin Tandy Key (1715 – 1791)
son of John Key

William Bibb Key (1759 – 1836)
son of Martin Tandy Key

Margaret Key (1794 – 1880)
daughter of William Bibb Key

Joshua Goode (1828 – )
son of Margaret Key

Charles K Goode (1877 – 1946)
son of Joshua Goode

Ben Cates Goode (1909 – 1980)
son of Charles K Goode

Evelyn Deloris Goode
You are the daughter of Ben Cates Goode

Martin Tandy Key 4th Great Grandfather


Martin Tandy Rev

Martin Key, Sr., lived in the 1770’s near Point of Fork in present Fluvanna
County, Virginia and was the county’s first sheriff (1777). Later he moved to
property he owned on the Rivanna River adjoining land owned by Thomas
Jefferson. After his death in 1791, his widow frequently sold corn, oats and fowls
to Jefferson in the period form 1792 – 1804. There are also other Key’s, including
Walter and James (probably Martin’s sons) listed in Thomas Jefferson’s account
books as having sold corn to him during this time.
Martin Key, Sr. was an active purchaser of land and acquired an estate of several
thousand acres located between Southwest Mountain and the Rivanna, from
Edgemont on the Barboursville Road to the bend of the river below the Free
Bridge, in Albemarle County, Virginia. He patented land there in 1743, 1746 and
about 1784, and was given some of his father’s land in 1758. He acquired 1,350
acres in Fluvanna County, Virginia which was formed from Albemarle County.
Martin was one of the first vestrymen of Fluvanna Parish. About 1779 he returned
to the Southwest Mountain area of Albemarle County, where he succeeded to his
father’s home (“Key West”) and estate.
Reverend Francis Asbury was entertained as a guest in Martin Key’s home several
times while riding the Methodist circuit in Virginia. Later, however, in 1785,
another Methodist bishop, Reverend Thomas Coke, found Martin Key
inhospitable and was severely critical of him.
Martin Key was a planter and a large slave owner (he had sixty slaves in 1782),
and it was probably the abolitionist viewpoint of some of the clergy that caused
him to “shut his door against the preachers”.
Ann (Bibb) Key, daughter of Thomas Bibb, continued to live in Albemarle
County until about 1804, and then moved to Orange County, Va., where she died
about 1815.
Source: The Keys of Key West, Albemarle Co., Va.; Virginia Genealogist, Vol. 8,
Oct-Dec. 1964, pgs. 177 – 180, by Marcus M. Key; The Virginia Genealogist, Vol.
18, Apr. – Jun. 1974, pg. 102; The Virginia Gen. Vol. 29, July-Sep, 1985; Key and
Allied Families by Mrs. Julian C. Lane; Barbara Milligan, Administrator Ass’t. –
Monticello (Home of T. Jefferson); Martin Key, Sr’s. will 1785; Albemarle
County in Virginia, by Rev. Edgar Woods. pg. 245.
……………………………………………….
Martin Key built a house north of Red Bud Creek, known today as “Windy
Knowe”. It states in Historic Homes of Charlottesville, that the house was
originally built as a hunting lodge and place of carousal by a number of
Englishmen and Martin Key. The house, or hunting lodge, originally consisted of
one large room, with a smaller one above. The house is located about one half
mile north of John Key’s house, now called “Franklin” and is just off State Hwy.
20, or Elks Drive. Elk’s Drive was once “Old Stoney Point Road”. Mr. and Mrs.
Frederick Nolting lived in the house in 1980. A complete handwritten copy of
Martin Key’s will is available.
Martin Key’s WILL, dated April 14, 1791, was made in Fredericksville Parish,
Albemarle, Co., Virginia. It lists land, money, and slaves to be given to certain of
his children. One son, Henry, was willed 340 acres provided he “entirely declines
the vicious practices of gaming and excessive drinking.”
Martin Key, Sr. – Albemarle Co., Virginia. Prov. 1791. Mentions wife, Anne,
Sons: John, Martin, Tandy, Joshua, William Bibb, Henry, Jesse, James, Walter and
Thomas. Daughters: Elizabeth Daniel, and Martha. Grandson, Jesse, son of John.
(Key Court Records). (Kenneth N. Key has a copy of the Will).
Martin Key, Sr., was also concerned about the education of his youngest son,
Walter. Martin Jr. and John were lawyers. Many of Martin’s sons were
instrumental in the layout and building of roads and bridges in the area, as noted
in Historic Roads of Virginia, concerning the Three Notched Road.
Source: The Keys of Albemarle, James Leonard Owens, Oakman, Alabama.
………………………………………..

Windy Knoll Mtn Lodge

Originally the property of John Key, Sr. (1696 – after 1758) “Windie Knowe” stood near his mansion house “Key West”‘ which was built on land he patented in 1732 – 1741, on Albemarle County, Virginia. “Windie Knowe” was a kind of gentleman’s lodge.
Martin Key, eldest son of John Key, Sr., fell heir to this property, and later his son, Martin Key, Jr., inherited it, whose widow sold it to Richmond Terrell about 1840.
“Windie Knowe”, today (1950), is among the many places of interest and beauty given in “Jefferson’s Albemarle” a guide to Albemarle County and the City of Charlottesville, Virginia, page 121: Four tenths of a mile from “Windie Knowe” is the entrance to the Site of Key West, occupied now by a mid – nineteenth – century dwelling. Here stood once the mansion house built by John Key, Sr., on the land he patented in 1732 – 1741.
This picture of “Windie Knowe” was copied from the one which appears in Mary Rawlings book, “Ante-Bellum Albemarle” which is in the Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. and contributed to this book of the Key Family records by: Marcus M. Key, Jr. of Ind. and NewYork and Mrs. John E. Dance (Frances Pyron Dance) of Atlanta, GA, October, 1950.

Tandy Key Home

Martin Tandy Key (1715 – 1791
4th great-grandfather

William Bibb Key (1759 – 1836)
son of Martin Tandy Key

Margaret Key (1794 – 1880)
daughter of William Bibb Key

Joshua Goode (1828 – )
son of Margaret Key

Charles K Goode (1877 – 1946)
son of Joshua Goode

Ben Cates Goode (1909 – 1980)
son of Charles K Goode

Evelyn Deloris Goode
You are the daughter of Ben Cates Goode

William Bibb Key 3rd Great Grandfather


American Revolutionary Soilder“WILLIAM BIBB KEY, b. Albemarle Co., Va., Oct. 2, 1759; d. Dec 7, 1836, Elbert Co., Ga. Served as a REV. SOLDIER. Received bounty grant of land for his services. Married Mourning Clark, b. Aug. 12, 1764 (dau. of CHRISTOPHER CLARK, REV. SOLDIER of Ga., and his wife Millicent Terrell).
Children:
1. Charles, b. 1784; mar. Mary Ann Clark.
2. Martha, mar. Nicholas Good.
3. James, b. 1788; mar. Rebecca Grizzle.
4. Milly, b. 1790; mar. Humphrey Posey.
5. Nancy, mar. Simeon Glenn.
6. Elizabeth, mar. Thomas Bell.
7. Margaret, mar. Thomas Good.
8. Keturah, mar. James Hamm.
9. Mary (Polly), mar. Joseph Bell.
10. Henry, d. y.
11. Thomas, d. y.
12. Susan, b. 1799; mar. James Bell, Jr.
13. Jane, b. 1801; mar. John Grizzle.
14. Sarah, b. 1803; mar. Thomas C. Elliott.
15. Lucy, b. 1809; mar. Nathan Mattox.”
Source: McCall, Mrs. Howard H., Roster of Revolutionary Soldiers in Georgia (Baltimore, MD, USA: Genealogical Publishing Co., 2004), Volume III, page 136.

William Bibb Key married Mourning Clark on 23 Dec 1782 in Albemarle County, Virginia, USA.

When William Bibb Key died he was buried in the Key Family Cemetery. His burial is marked with a ledger stone. He and his wife had been married nearly 54 years.

William Bibb Key is listed on the Revolutionary War Soldiers Memorial monument in Elbert County, Georgia which was dedicated on November 11, 1994 by the Stephen Heard Chapter of the NSDAR.

Inscription:
In Memory of WM. B. KEY Who was born In Albemarle Co., Virginia
October 2nd, 1759
And Died in Elbert Co., Georgia
December 7th, 1836
Aged 77 years, 2 months & 5 days
—–
Erected by N. & L. Mattox, 1850

The Pictures below were taken at a recent grave marking for William Bibb Key. The Sons Of The American Revolution placed the marker September 2, 2017

Note: One of the only two identifiable graves in this cemetery.
Burial:
Key Family Cemetery
Elbert County
Georgia, USA20170902_134042 20170902_13404620170902_13410020170902_141520

William Bibb Key (1759 – 1836)
3rd great-grandfather

Margaret Key (1794 – 1880)
daughter of William Bibb Key

Joshua Goode (1828 – )
son of Margaret Key

Charles Key Goode (1877 – 1946)
son of Joshua Goode

Ben Cates Goode (1909 – 1980)
son of Charles K Goode

Evelyn Deloris Goode
You are the daughter of Ben Cates Goode

Finding my Roots/Key branch


key-coat-of-arms-family-crest-2

History of the Key Family

When surnames were brought into use not every person could read or write, merely pronounce their names, and we find various ways in which all surnames are spelt, caused by the persons writing them and by provincial or dialectic pronunciation, which accounts for many of the variations in the spelling of key (Kei, Kee, Kea, Kay, Keese, keyes and so on.)

The earliest records of the family are found in England. On the Fabric Roll of York Minister and the wills and inventories, John Kay appears, and on the Old Hundred Rolls, Jordan Kay’s name is inscribed. Later records show that a Nicholas Kay (1420) lived near London and who was probably the father of John Key, the poet laureate of Edward IV. This John Key is noted as having committed to posterity an English prose translation of a Latin history of the siege of Roads, in the title of which, dedicating his work to Edward IV, in 1442 he called himself “hys humble Poet Laureate.”

Thomas Key, son of Gilbert Key of Kent, resided in Forest Place, where he died about 1525. He left issue among who was Richard Key, Sergt.-at-arms to Henry VIII, and Capt. Sandgate Castle 1540. Richard Key married Mrs. Mildred Diggs, daughter of Sir John Scott and the widow of John Diggs. Richard and Mildred Key had the following children: Thomas, William, Edward, Reginald, and Sibbell.

Thomas Key,(1540-1578), son of Richard was Queen Elizabeth’s Sergeant Porter. He married (1)___? and had two children Thomas and Isabell Key. In August 1565, he secretly married Mary Grey, a maid of honor at Queens Court. She was the daughter of Henry and Francis (Brandon) Grey and granddaughter of Charles Brandon Duke of Suffolk, and his wife Mary daughter of Henry VII, and sister of Lady Jane Grey. (Reg. Dictionary of National Biography Vol. 31, p. 87.)

John Kaye of Woodsome, who was advanced to the dignity of baronet by King Charles1,Feb.4, 1641.

John Key of Milcombe in Oxfordshire, had two sons (Probably others), Richard and Josiah. The latter applied in 1688 for a grant of arms, and his petition was supported by Lord Clarendon in whose service he was, and by John Thornicroft who married Josiah’s daughter and heir, Elizabeth Key. Josiah
is described as a man of good repute and ample fortune, well able to support the charges and position of a gentlemen. The petition was granted. The coat-ofarms conferred being; argent, two bendlets humetty purpure. Josiah Key died in 1695 leaving a sum of money to his brother Richard, and his estate to his son-in-law, John Thornicroft. In 1701, the later petitioned to leave the bendlets in the arms, granted to his late father-in-law, changed from purpure to stable, and his petition was granted but Sir Arthur of Yorkshire, who bore two bendlets sable, opposed the grant as the new arms resembled his own too closely. Accordingly in 1704, the Earl Marshall granted to the Key; Argent two bendlets pean (black and gold fur), the bendlets being know longer huetty.

Richard, son of John Key of Oxfordshire, England married Mary Cartwright, and had issue, vis: Phillip, born in Loundon, March 21,1696, Henry and perhaps other children.* Henry and Phillip came to America and settled on the north bank of the Potomac River, near Leonardtown, Henry is said to have died young and unmarried. Phillip was the great grandfather of Francis Scott Key, the author of the “Star-Spangled Banner.”

THE KEY EMIGRANTS

“God sifted many nations that He might bring good seed into this wilderness.”

From the very beginning of the English settlement in America we find among the colonists, the name Key and from then until 1720 there were at least seventy-five emigrants of the Key family. of whom were John Key of Main, Robert and Solomon of Massachusetts, John and Moses of Pennsylvania, William, Peter, and Phillip in Maryland, Daniel, Thomas, Adam, William, Martin, and Robert in Virginia, and John, William, and Thomas in the Barbados. They were decedents from a long line of noble ancestry, distinguished in the military annals of their kingdom from the days of the first Crusade.

Those Pioneers of this Country, with their heroic virtues helped to make the wilderness to blossom as a rose and become the greatest habitation on the face of the globe for us who now enjoy its bountiful inheritance, Surely,

“Theirs were deeds which should not pass away,
And their names which must not Wither.”

Source: Key And Allied Families – By Mrs. Julian C. Lane

Mary Ann Fouracres Trigg 6th Great Grandmother 1738-1796


Flag of MarylandMary Ann Fouracres (Foreacres)
b. c1738 d.1796

Finding information about any of our ancestors requires some digging. Often they remain merely names and dates of birth and death. This situation is particularly true in regard to women.

In times past historians were sometimes negligent in recording information about women. Unless a woman was a ruler, very little beyond name, birth, and death made the pages of public records—much less history books. Of course we must remember that for centuries women were considered chattel. Even fairly near to our own time the comment was made that “a lady’s name should only appear in the newspaper three times: when she is born, when she marries, and when she dies.”

Nevertheless, women have played an important part in making our history and our family what it is today. One such woman is our ancestor Mary Ann Fouracres. Though “just a woman” she shows the importance of ancestors in general and the courage and brains of one particular woman.

Parents

Mary Ann Fouracres was born in St. Luke’s Parish, Queen Anne, Maryland in c1738. She was the daughter of John Fouracres/Foreacres (b. 1714 d. 1756) and Sarah Eleanor Halts.(nd) John was born in Delaware, but after his marriage in Maryland on July 13, 1735, he and Sarah made their home in that colony. John was a planter who within five years owned one hundred acres of land in MD. John Fouracres served as a private in the MD colonial militia under Capt. James Brown.

Mary Ann was one of several children. Her siblings were Elizabeth, John, Jr., and Isaac. John and Sarah had two other children who either died in infancy or whose names are unknown.

The Adventure

As a young girl, Mary Ann had an adventure that has been retold for over 250 years. For some reason in about 1750 when she was around twelve years old, Mary Ann was not living with her own family but with a neighbor lady. We are not told why the girl did not live with her family, but it was customary in those days to apprentice young men to craftsmen to learn a trade, and for young girls to serve as maids or helpers in neighboring homes. This was especially so in the case of neighbors who were older women or for those recovering from childbirth. Mary was the second child of six, so her family might have needed the money she would have made as a helper or they might have allowed her to stay with the woman as a kindness.

One day the lady sent Mary Ann to her nearest neighbor’s house. That nearest neighbor lived three miles away, and to get there, the girl had to go through a heavily wooded area and across a creek. Mary Ann made the trip just fine. She accomplished her errand and started her trip back to her mistress’s house.

On the way home she heard the unmistakable cry of a mountain lion or panther some distance behind her. It seemed to be on the same road or path she was traveling. Mary Ann grew frightened. Perhaps the animal was stalking her.

The twelve year old began to run as quickly as she could. Behind her she could still hear the panther. Its cries were getting louder. It was gaining on her. What could she do? She knew that she could not possibly outrun the panther. It would be on her before she could get home. Suddenly she saw the creek before her, and an idea came to her mind. She waded out into the water and then downstream for as far as she dared. She saw a tree growing in the water or near its edge and quickly climbed up into the thickest part of its branches, covering herself as best she could with the boughs and leaves.

Very shortly after she had hidden herself, Mary Ann peeked through the leaves. To her horror she saw that what she had feared was true. A panther moved steadily down the path to the creek. He sniffed the ground then moved into the water and crossed to the other side. There he tried to pick up the girl’s trail again. Of course he couldn’t find the trail because Mary Ann had gone downstream, not across it. She sat silently, holding her breath while she waited to see what the panther would do. All the time the panther kept screaming his awful cries. Luckily the wind was blowing downstream so the panther could not detect Mary Ann’s scent.

Mary Ann could see the panther clearly. She watched his search and listened to his cries. Finally the beast appeared to give up and wandered slowly away, up the valley. Again Mary Ann was lucky in that the panther kept up its fearful screams. When the cries became faint, the girl assumed that the time was safe to try to escape. She quickly climbed down the tree and ran home to her mistress.

Mary Ann’s life was fairly tame after that horrible adventure.

Marriage and Family

In 1757 when she was about nineteen years old, she married Clemant Trigg, Jr. son of Clemant Trigg and his wife, Sarah Bullett, Six years later the couple moved into Gloven Hall which was located on 75 acres of land in MD. Clement and his brother had purchased the house and a larger holding of land when their father fell on misfortune. The elder Trigg was heavily into debt with London merchants. He absconded in the middle of the night, leaving his land holdings to fall wherever they might. The county condemned, seized, and appraised the land, preparing it for public sale. Clement, Jr. and his brother Jeremiah bought the property and divided it between the two of them as an “inheritance” from their father.

Clement was a planter like Mary Ann’s father. They continued to live at Gloven Hall throughout the major portion of their marriage, and reared ten children there: Mary, Elizabeth, James, William, Drucilla, Joshua, Rhoda, Simeon, Sarah, and Samuel. Mary Ann’s second child, Elizabeth Trigg grew up to marry Timothy Ragan (1747-?). It is from Elizabeth that we descend.

In 1776 the Triggs appeared on the Church Census for Prince George Co., MD. Sometime between that date and 1 Feb1779, the family moved to Caswell Co., NC. On Feb 1, 1779, Clement made an entry for 1640 acres of land on the waters of Fish Pond in Caswell Co., NC. Unfortunately, Clement died shortly thereafter, and by October 21, 1779, the state issued a warrant for the survey of the land for Mary Ann Trigg, Clement’s widow.1735-17 Mysteriously, on 13 Oct 1783 the state crossed out Mary Ann’s name and re-inserted Clement Trigg Why would they have done that? Clement had been dead for four years. The chain carriers for the survey were R. Gebron and Timothy Ragan, Clement’s son in law. Is there any significance to Timothy being a chain bearer?

Later Life

After Clement Trigg died, Mary remarried . Her new husband’s name was Thomas Hatsfield, Other than his name, nothing seems to be known about this man. He, like Clement, also predeceased Mary. The marriage was a short one, for by 1786 Mary Ann was a widow who was listed at the head of household in the State Census of NC. Mary herself died ten years later in 1796 in Caswell, NC at fifty-eight years of age.

Mary’s Ann Fouracres’ life was a normal one with the exception of the panther adventure. That adventure, however, shows us how important ancestors are. If that panther had killed Mary Ann, and if she had died when she was 12 years old, she could not have grown up to marry and have children. None of us who descended from her would be here today. Lucky for us Mary Ann was smart enough to save herself.

Elizabeth Faye Trigg (1760 – 1825)
5th great-grandmother
Richard Reagan (1776 – 1829)
son of Elizabeth Faye Trigg
Daniel Wesley Reagan (1803 – 1892)
son of Richard Reagan
Richard Reason Reagan (1830 – 1912)
son of Daniel Wesley Reagan
Nancy Elizabeth Reagan (1849 – 1931)
daughter of Richard Reason Reagan
Martha Elizabeth Abbott/Whitaker/Goode (1872 – 1911)
daughter of Nancy Elizabeth Reagan
Ben Cates Goode (1909 – 1980)
son of Martha Elizabeth Abbott/Whitaker/Goode
Evelyn Deloris Goode
You are the daughter of Ben Cates Goode

Col.Thomas Jefferson Goode 4th Great Uncle


Thomas Jefferson Goode-Continental Soldier
Posted 03 May 2018 by EvelynMiller1939
The following is summerized from THE HOUSE OF GOODE by Louise Goode Shannon.
On 26 February 1776 at the age of sixteen, Thomas Goode enlisted as a private with the Continental Forces. He was assigned to Capt. Samuel Hopkins’ Company of Col. Mordecai Buckner’s Sixth Virginia Regiment for a term of two years. He stated that he entered the war with zeal and quit, he conscientiously believes, with honor and credit to himself. Thomas was discharged on 26 February 1778. Later he would be posthumously honored with a historical marker on the site of his Covington, Tennessee home. According to his records he was hospitalized at Trenton and was at Yorktown when Corwallis surrendered in October 1781. He was discharged at Valley Forge.
Thomas and Sarah married on 29 May 1753. Thirty years later in 1783, they moved to Rutherford County, North Carolina to be near Sarah’s widowed mother, who had moved earlier. Thomas owned and operated a water mill, being situated on Floyd’s and Dilles Creek. The mill was used to grind corn into cornmeal for himself and neighbors. The neighbors would pay Thomas with a percentage of the corn or the meal. He then exchanged that for cash with those who had not planted a corn crop.
On August 9, 1805 Thomas sold all his land to Robert Goode and Barnett Seay, and the family moved to Jefferson County, Alabama. By the fall of 1826 Thomas and Sarah had moved to Tipton County, Tennessee to the town of Covington. They remained in Covington until their deaths in 1846.
A transcription of Thomas’ will is as follows:
I, Thomas Goode, being very old and infirm in body but of sound mind and memory and wishing to make other and different disposition of my worldly effects, them that regulated by the laws of the land, do make and publish this my last will and testament as follows:
First, I wish all my just debts if any and funeral expenses to be paid out of any money or property of which I may die possessed.
Second, As I have already at different times given to all my children, except those herein after named, their respective full and equal portions of my estate or more, it is my wish and desire that the whole of property and money of which I am at this time possessed, shall be divided to witt. I will and bequeath to my daughter Addilisa Clifton my pied or red and white spotted heifer. To my son Thomas Jefferson Goode I give and bequeath one bedstead, feather bed and furniture, and the white no horn cow. And owing to the present bodily affliction of my daughter Maranda Greer, and as some return for her trouble and the instant kind and affectionate attention she has bestowed both upon myself and her mother during our infirm old age, I will and bequeath to her all the remainder of my property, money, and effects of every kind and description after the satisfaction of the above named bequests embracing my house and lot in Covington to her and her heirs forever, to do with and dispose of as she may think proper.
Lastly, I do hereby appoint my daughter Maranda Greer executrix of this my last will & testament for the due execution of which, it is my wish that she shall not be required by the court to give security to her bond.
In testimony of which I hereunto subscribed my name and affixed my seal this 26th day of November.
Signed & acknowledged in our presence the day and date above written R. H Munfore, R.I. Mitchell.
On June 5, 1993, Thomas was honored with the placing of a historical marker at the site of his home in Covington, Tennessee.

Thomas Jefferson Goode

Col THOMAS Jefferson Sr Goode (1760 – 1846)
4th great-uncle

Edward Goode III (1719 – 1796)
father of Col THOMAS Jefferson Sr Goode

Joseph Goode (1745 – 1828)
son of Edward Goode III

Thomas Goode (1791 – 1858)
son of Joseph Goode

Joshua Goode (1828 – )
son of Thomas Goode

Charles K Goode (1877 – 1946)
son of Joshua Goode

Ben Cates Goode (1909 – 1980)
son of Charles K Goode

Evelyn Deloris Goode
You are the daughter of Ben Cates Goode

JOHN OGLE NOTES


Notes

Young John Ogle early became aware of the difficulties which his family were likely to experience after the Restoration, and he undoubtedly had heard tales of adventures in the New World; and so when the opportunity was presented to him him, John Ogle joined Colonel Nicolls’ expedition, bound for America.

In March 1664, the whole of the territory in America occupied by the Dutch on the Atlantic seaboard was granted by Charles II to his brother, the Duke of York, on the plea that it was British soil by right of discovery. On 25 May 1664, Colonel Nicolls, with four ships, 300 soldiers and 450 men, sailed from Portsmouth. The expedition arrived at New Amsterdam, and without firing a shot, Governor Stuyvesant surrendered the town on 29 August and promptly changed the name to New York.

Delaware had been origanally settled by Swedes, who quarrelled with the Dutch, who built Fort Casimir 6 miles from the Swedish Fort Christiana. In 1654 Governor Rising brought a large number of colonists from Sweden; he took Fort Casimir, renaming it Fort of the Holy Trinity, in honor of the day of capture. Governor Stuyvesant, who later came down from New Amsterdam and recaptured the fort, renamed it New Amstel.

John Ogle, who had served under Captain Carr in Delaware, became a permanent resident of White Clay Creek Hundred, named from the deposits of white clay found along its banks. John Ogle first resided at New Castle, where he was a large land-buyer; he afterwards lived at various sites on his extensive holdings. He commenced acquiring land at an early date, probably as soon as the confusion of the conquest and the settlement of Indian troubles permitted it.

The first grant that John Ogle received was in February 1666, from Governor Nicolls, who had empowered the officers of Delaware to dispose of ‘implanted’ land there for the best advantage of the inhabitants. The parcel known as Muscle Cripple was granted to Sgt Thomas Wollaston, John Ogle, John Hendricks and Herman Johnson. It consisted of a part of 300 acres and was bounded by a creek at the head of Bread and Cheese Island and also by the plantations of Hans Bones and James Crawford. Sgt Wollaston had been a comrad in arms, as had James Crawford of the adjoining plantation. James Crawford, having gained some knowledge of medicine in the army, was known as ‘Doctor’ on the early assessment rolls. His daughter Mary was later to marry into the Ogle family. Crawford was one of the heroes of the Nicolls expedition, his grant specifically stating that it was given ‘in consideration of the good service performed by James Crawford, a soldier’.

The story of John Ogle is closely bound up whith that of his friends Thomas Wollaston and James Crawford, who took a liking to young Ogle and formed a friendship which continued throughout their lives.

The three friends settled on nearby plantations in New Castle County, where their wives survived them. The Records of the Court of Newcastle give a picture of their lives after 1676.

The three are the foundation of the Ogle genealogy. John Ogle’s son Thomas married Mary Crawford, daughter of James. Wollastaon connections appear in the fourth and fifth generations. Joseph Ogle married Priscilla Wollaston, and their son Samuel married Deborah Wollaston.

An eye-witness account of the events of June 1675 has revealed something of the character of John Ogle of that period – swashbuckling, rash and reckless, with an amount of courage appropriate to the rough and tumble frontier environment. He was not one to be imposed on, especially by one of the Dutch who certainly did not amount to much in the eys of His Majesty’s soldiers. Under order of the Governor-General, the magistrates met at New Castle on 4 June 1675, and decided that it would be necessary to build a road across the marsh and to build a dyke in the marsh next to the town. Another dyke across Hans Block’s marsh was also thought necessary, and the inhabitants were orderd to assist in the project by contributing labour or money. The project was strenuously opposed by the settlers because the dyke across Hans Block’s marsh was an improvement to private property. John Ogle was a leader of the objectors and peremptorily informed the magistrates that no dykes at all would be built under any such unfair conditions. His objections stirred the people to great excitement in the church where the public meeting was held; and Ogle was put out of the church. Mathys Smith and the Rev. Jacobus Fabricius took up the cause and as a result Ogle and Fabricius were arrested. They were confined in a boat which was anchored nearby, where they continued their public imprecations. Excitement was high, and they were eventually released. Later Hans Block encountered Ogle on the street and was told that if the Finns had been drunk no good would have come from the incident. It was an affront to constituted authority and called for severe disciplinary measures.

Conditions in New Castle were not good at that time; carousals, fights and robberies were the order of the day, and it wasn’t a safe place for a stranger. William Edmunsdon, ‘a Public Friend’ visiting there, found it difficult to secure lodgings, ‘the inhabitants being chiefly Dutch and Finns addicted to drunkenness’, who refused to take him in, even though he had money.

Special warrants were issued by the Governor against Fabricius and Ogle, who with others had signed a remonstrance. The two chief trouble makers were ordered to appear in the August Court, and the other signers before a later court. Fabricius appeared and the proceedings resulted in the unfrocking of the troublesome person; Ogle, who conveniently fell sick, failed to appear, and no further action was taken against him.

After the excitement of the summer of 1675, Ogle proceeded to acquire more land, and the tract known as Hampton, on the south side of St. George’s Creek, consisting of 300 acres, was confirmed to him by Governor Andross on 5 November 1675.

New Castle court records reveal that in February 1676 Ogle accused one of the Dutch residents of stealing his heiffer. As one of the jurmen was Thomas Wollaston, the outcome was predictable.

The above incident marked the beginning of a series of court proceedings which involved John Ogle and James Crawford for the rest of their lives. Ogle was an extensive producer of tobacco, and like other planters he was continually involved in financial and other difficulties. Little ready money changed hands in those days, and the barter system was the common way of doing business.

Various deeds of the period after 1678 record transfers of extensive tracts of land to a number of Ogle’s associates; among them, Swart Neuton’s Island was transferred to John Darby of Maryland, and other lands to John Test and to Augustine Dixon.

In 1675 the Governor ordered the construction of highways, and the inhabitants of New Castle and the surrounding area, and on the south side of Christiana Creek were made responsible for constructing a highway from New Castle to Red Lyon between the first of January and the end of Frebruary. The highway was to be a good passable one, twelve feet wide, and John Ogle was appointed overseer of the residenst around Christiana Creek.

On 25 August 1680, Thomas Wollaston of White Clay Creek wrote a letter to John Briggs of West Jersey which he gave to John Ogle for delivery. Wollaston had a debt of three years standing against Briggs. Ogle made the journey, stopping in New York, where 27 August he made an affidavit concerning the transaction. The affidavit began: ‘John Ogle, aged thirty-two or thereabouts, . . . . .

The incident itself is not important, but Ogle’s statement of his approximate age has been of crucial importance to ogle genealogy, as without it, it would have been impossible to connect him with absolute certainty to his Northumberland Family.

In November 1681 Ogle received a court order to take up 200 acres of land for each of his two sons, Thomas and John Ogle, and on 27 December 435 acres, called the ‘Fishing Place’, on Christiana Creek were surveyed on the warrant. On August of the following year, Northampton, a tract of 200 acres in White Clay Creek Hundred was surveyed for Ogle. On 14 October 1683 more acres in Mill Creek Hundred were surveyed for him, and on 8 December Eagles Point in White Clay Creek Hundred was also surveyed. This ended the accumulation of the original Ogle acreage, for in 1683 John Ogle died.

Source: ‘Smoky Mountain Clans’, Donald B. Reagan, 1978, p 128b. ‘The English Origin of John Ogle’, Francis Hamilton Hibbard, 1967, p 9-14. ‘Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne’s Descendants’, Langston & Buck, 1986, p 199.

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© Copyright 1995, 1996 David L. Beckwith

John Ogle 8th Great Grandfather


John Ogle
John Ogle was born on September 30, 1649, at Berwick Upon Tweed, Northumberland, England to John Ogle of the same place. The elder John was from Eglingham, and in 1650 received a commission as captain of militia for the four northern counties, and the next year he was under the commonwealth a commissioner and also commanding a troop of horse in Scotland. According to Mormon Church which deals in genealogy, John was a direct descendant of King Edward the First. The Ogle?s had their own castle in Northumberland.

Young John Ogle early became aware of the difficulties which his family were likely to experience after the Restoration, and he undoubtedly had heard tales of adventures in the New World; and so when the opportunity was presented to him, John Ogle joined Colonel Nicolls’ expedition, bound for America. He was a scant 14 when he joined Nicholl?s ranks.

In March 1664, the whole of the territory in America occupied by the Dutch on the Atlantic seaboard was granted by Charles II to his brother, the Duke of York, on the plea that it was British soil by right of discovery. On 25 May 1664, Colonel Nicolls, with four ships, 300 soldiers and 450 men, sailed from Portsmouth. The expedition arrived at New Amsterdam, and without firing a shot, Governor Stuyvesant surrendered the town on 29 August and promptly changed the name to New York.

Delaware had been originally settled by Swedes, who quarreled with the Dutch, who built Fort Casimir 6 miles from the Swedish Fort Christiana. In 1654 Governor Rising brought a large number of colonists from Sweden; he took Fort Casimir, renaming it Fort of the Holy Trinity, in honor of the day of capture. Governor Stuyvesant, who later came down from New Amsterdam and recaptured the fort, renamed it New Amstel.

John Ogle, who had served under Captain Carr in Delaware, became a permanent resident of White Clay Creek Hundred, named from the deposits of white clay found along its banks. John Ogle first resided at New Castle, where he was a large land-buyer; he afterwards lived at various sites on his extensive holdings. He commenced acquiring land at an early date, probably as soon as the confusion of the conquest and the settlement of Indian troubles permitted it.

The first grant that John Ogle received was in February 1666, from Governor Nicolls, who had empowered the officers of Delaware to dispose of ‘implanted’ land there for the best advantage of the inhabitants. This tract was 800 or 1000 acres total, including a 300 acre tract known as “Muscle Cripple”. The original document omits the exact acreage, but it requires a yearly quitrent of 8 bushels of wheat, the standard being 1 bushel for each hundred acres per year. Later records record him owning 1,000 acres in Christiana, although it is unknown if it was all from the original grant or a combination of lands. The following is the wording in the Duke of York?s grant of this land:

“A Confirmation granted unto Sergeant Thomas Wollaston, John Ogle, John Hendrick, and Hermann Johnston, for a certain parcel of land in White Clay kill in Delaware River

Richard Nicholls, Esqr. &c Whereas there is a certain piece or parcel of land lying and being in White Clay kill near unto Christeen kill in Delaware River bounded to the E. with Hans Bones Plantation to the South with James Crawford’s, to the North and West by a fresh creek or Run of water at the head of Bread and Cheese Island containing about (blank) acres of woodland, as also a piece of valley or meadow ground known by the name of Muscle Cripple running up the kill about (blank) of a mile which said piece or parcel of land was by the officers of Delaware who were empowered by my commission to dispose of implanted land there for the best advantage of the inhabitants granted unto Sergeant Thomas Wollaston, John Ogle, John Hendrick, and Herman Johnson, the said grant bearing date (blank) day of February 1666. Now for a confirmation unto them the said Thomas Wollaston, John Ogle, John Hendrick, and Herman Johnston, in their possession and enjoyment of the premises. Know yee that by virtue of the commission and authority to me given, I have given ratified confirmed and granted unto the said Thomas Wollaston &c. the afore recited parcels of land and premises, &c., yielding and paying therefore yearly and every year unto his Majesties use eight bushels of Wheat as a Quit Rent when it shall be demanded, by such person or persons in authority as his majesty shall please to establish and empower in Delaware River and the parts and plantations adjacent. Given under my hand and seal, at Fort James, in New York, on the Island Manhattan, the first day of August, in the 20th year of his Majesty’s reign, Anno Domini, 1668.”

The land as platted for Ogle was a long rectangle, lying between the north side of the Christiana Creek and the south side of the White Clay Creek. It encompasses the area currently encompassing the town of Christiana, the Christiana Mall, and the Christiana Hospital Center Complex. It was bounded on the east by Hans Bones, the south by James Crawford, and the southeast by Sergeant John Erskine. The north and west were undeveloped, due to the fact that they were above the head of navigation on the streams.

The parcel known as Muscle Cripple was granted to Sgt Thomas Wollaston, John Ogle, John Hendricks and Herman Johnson. It consisted of a part of 300 acres and was bounded by a creek at the head of Bread and Cheese Island and also by the plantations of Hans Bones and James Crawford. Sgt Wollaston had been a comrade in arms, as had James Crawford of the adjoining plantation. James Crawford, having gained some knowledge of medicine in the army, was known as ‘Doctor’ on the early assessment rolls. His daughter Mary was later to marry into the Ogle family. Crawford was one of the heroes of the Nicolls expedition, his grant specifically stating that it was given ‘in consideration of the good service performed by James Crawford, a soldier’. In addition, John Ogle purchased lands along St. George?s Creek, near the present town of Delaware City. It was on these lands to which some of his sons would later relocate. The story of John Ogle is closely bound up with that of his friends Thomas Wollaston and James Crawford, who took a liking to young Ogle and formed a friendship which continued throughout their lives. In about 1670, Ogle married Elizabeth Petersdotter.

Elizabeth Petersdotter was the daughter of Peter Jochimsson, a settler in New Sweden in the first voyage in 1642. Eshe was born in 1654, moved from her home as a teenager to help in the household of her uncle, Anders Stille, living on Christina River. Here she met and married John Ogle, an English soldier who had participated in the English conquest of the Delaware in 1664. John and Elizabeth Ogle had two sons:

Thomas Ogle, born c. 1672, died 1734 in White Clay Creek Hundred, New Castle County; married [1] Mary Crawford, [2] widow Elizabeth Graham., John Ogle, born c. 1674, died 1720 in White Clay Creek Hundred; married widow Elizabeth Harris.

John Ogle and Rev. Jacob Fabritius were indicted in 1675 for inciting the Swedes and Finns to riot in opposition to orders of the New Castle Court to build a dike and road for Hans Block, a Dutchman. The three friends settled on nearby plantations in New Castle County, where their wives survived them. The Records of the Court of Newcastle give a picture of their lives after 1676.

An eye-witness account of the events of June 1675 has revealed something of the character of John Ogle of that period – swashbuckling, rash and reckless, with an amount of courage appropriate to the rough and tumble frontier environment. He was not one to be imposed on, especially by one of the Dutch who certainly did not amount to much in the eyes of His Majesty’s soldiers. Under order of the Governor-General, the magistrates met at New Castle on 4 June 1675, and decided that it would be necessary to build a road across the marsh and to build a dyke in the marsh next to the town. Another dyke across Hans Block’s marsh was also thought necessary, and the inhabitants were ordered to assist in the project by contributing labor or money. The project was strenuously opposed by the settlers because the dyke across Hans Block’s marsh was an improvement to private property. John Ogle was a leader of the objectors and peremptorily informed the magistrates that no dykes at all would be built under any such unfair conditions. His objections stirred the people to great excitement in the church where the public meeting was held; and Ogle was put out of the church. Mathys Smith and the Rev. Jacobus Fabricius took up the cause and as a result Ogle and Fabricius were arrested. They were confined in a boat which was anchored nearby, where they continued their public imprecations. Excitement was high, and they were eventually released. Later Hans Block encountered Ogle on the street and was told that if the Finns had been drunk no good would have come from the incident. It was an affront to constituted authority and called for severe disciplinary measures.

Conditions in New Castle were not good at that time; carousals, fights and robberies were the order of the day, and it wasn’t a safe place for a stranger. William Edmunsdon, ‘a Public Friend’ visiting there, found it difficult to secure lodgings, ‘the inhabitants being chiefly Dutch and Finns addicted to drunkenness’, who refused to take him in, even though he had money.

Special warrants were issued by the Governor against Fabricius and Ogle, who with others had signed a remonstrance. The two chief trouble makers were ordered to appear in the August Court, and the other signers before a later court. Fabricius appeared and the proceedings resulted in the unfrocking of the troublesome person; Ogle, who conveniently fell sick, failed to appear, and no further action was taken against him.

After the excitement of the summer of 1675, Ogle proceeded to acquire more land, and the tract known as Hampton, on the south side of St. George’s Creek, consisting of 300 acres, was confirmed to him by Governor Andross on 5 November 1675.

New Castle court records reveal that in February 1676 Ogle accused one of the Dutch residents of stealing his heifer. As one of the jurymen was Thomas Wollaston, the outcome was predictable.

The above incident marked the beginning of a series of court proceedings which involved John Ogle and James Crawford for the rest of their lives. Ogle was an extensive producer of tobacco, and like other planters he was continually involved in financial and other difficulties. Little ready money changed hands in those days, and the barter system was the common way of doing business.

In 1675 the Governor ordered the construction of highways, and the inhabitants of New Castle and the surrounding area, and on the south side of Christiana Creek were made responsible for constructing a highway from New Castle to Red Lyon between the first of January and the end of February. The highway was to be a good passable one, twelve feet wide, and John Ogle was appointed overseer of the residents around Christiana Creek.

Various deeds of the period after 1678 record transfers of extensive tracts of land to a number of Ogle’s associates; among them, Swart Neuton’s Island was transferred to John Darby of Maryland, and other lands to John Test and to Augustine Dixon.

Ogle was instrumental in the construction of a bridge over the Christiana Creek on his land. “The court at New Castle in 1679 specified that certain roads were to be laid out ten feet wide, under the jurisdiction of an overseer. The inhabitants on the north side of the Christiana were ordered to clear a road to Christina Head and there erect a bridge. The head of tidewater on the Delmarva Peninsula was the preordained site of a town, so at an early date, the little hamlet that was to become Christiana Bridge had sent its roots into the soil. Higher up on the Christiana, John Ogle and the Quaker, Valentine Hollingsworth had each come into possession of 1000 acres. (Weslager 1947:39). “The area that was to become the village was originally part of a tract called “Eagle’s Point” which was surveyed for John Ogle by the government of William Penn in 1683. This parcel of land was located to the north of the present-day intersection of routes 7 and 273, and contained the upland and high ground north of the modern town. Ogle (sic :Ogle’s descendants) sold this parcel in 1731 to Dr. Rees Jones, a “practicioner of Physick”, and a prominent individual in the village, and the land was resurveyed to Jones in 1741″ (Catts 1989:22).

On 25 August 1680, Thomas Wollaston of White Clay Creek wrote a letter to John Briggs of West Jersey which he gave to John Ogle for delivery. Wollaston had a debt of three years standing against Briggs. Ogle made the journey, stopping in New York, where 27 August he made an affidavit concerning the transaction. The affidavit began: ‘John Ogle, aged thirty-two or thereabouts,” The incident itself is not important, but Ogle’s statement of his approximate age has been of crucial importance to ogle genealogy, as without it, it would have been impossible to connect him with absolute certainty to his Northumberland Family.

John Ogle was recorded as owning 400 acres of land near New Castle, and the 1,000 acre plantation in the “Constabulary of North Christina Creek” in 1680 (Records of New Castle, II, pps 80, 83).

In November 1681 Ogle received a court order to take up 200 acres of land for each of his two sons, Thomas and John Ogle, and on 27 December 435 acres, called the ‘Fishing Place’, on Christiana Creek were surveyed on the warrant. On August of the following year, Northampton, a tract of 200 acres in White Clay Creek Hundred was surveyed for Ogle. On 14 October 1683 more acres in Mill Creek Hundred were surveyed for him, and on 8 December Eagles Point in White Clay Creek Hundred was also surveyed. This ended the accumulation of the original Ogle acreage, for in late 1683 John Ogle died.

John Ogle died insolvent in the winter of 1683/4. A clue to the death is found in the will of Ralph Hutchinson, which,. Although written and signed on February 16, 1679, it was not proved until December 31, 1683, and mentions land to go to ?John Ogle?s sons?, suggesting he may have died soon before (Calendar of Delaware Wills, p. 7).

As early as December 16, 1684, Elizabeth Ogle was complaining to the Court that her husband had already paid more than the appropriate amount of taxes on their holdings:

“Att a Court held at Newcastle for our Lord ye King & ye Hon?ble Proprietary December ye 16th 1684?Elisabeth Ogle brings in an account in Court that She hath paid many pounds more to her husbands account than the whole Estate of her said late husband did amount to by ye Appraysment (Records of New Castle, II, 93).”

Adding to his widow’s troubles was a 1684 raid by Colonel James Talbot from Maryland which resulted in the destruction of her hay and the building of a Maryland “fort” on her property. Elizabeth Ogle and Anders Stille then sold their property and moved to White Clay Creek. She lived at the “Hopyard,” which had been surveyed for her husband the year before.

The next listings of the taxables in Delaware, recorded in early 1685, early 1686, and 1687 listed Elizabeth Ogle as owning 1,000 acres on the north side of Christiana Creek (Records of New Castle, II, p. 102. 122. 170). However, apparently the question of whether the taxes were paid on the estate continued to plague Mrs. Ogle most of her life. She appeared in court a second time, in March of 1689, wherein it was recorded:

“Came into Court Elisabeth Ogle widdow and Administratrix of John Ogle deceased and made appear by Inventory and other papers and accounts in Court produced, that she hath over and above paid the Value of the Inventory of goods belonging to the said Ogle deceased, and committed to her Administration whereupon the Court grant her a Quieta est and discharge her from paying any more debts of the said John Ogle.”

Unable to pay all of the estate’s debts, Elizabeth Ogle was discharged from all further debts of her husband on 17 June 1690 by the New Castle Court. Meanwhile, her brother Peter Petersson Yocum in 1687 had purchased the “Hopyard” to protect it from creditors.

In 1696, Elizabeth?s son John began to sell off the lands around present day Christiana. A tract of 75 acres was sold by John Ogle to John Latham on March 16th, 1696, for “land at Christina Bridge” (Records of New Castle, II, 224); and on the same day sold ?the upper half of a tract of land at White Clay Creek, three hundred acres (Records of New Castle, II, 225). These land sales suggest that Elisabeth Ogle may have already been deceased by that date.

Elizabeth died before 12 Sept. 1702 when John Hans Steelman and Judith Yocum, as executors of the Yocum estate, sold the property. The family relocated to the area which was to become known as Ogletown, but maintained a wharf in Christiana as late as 1806, when the Orphans Court in the estate of Joseph Ogle recorded ?a Wharf and two old Store houses in Christiana Bridge? (New Castle County Orphans Court, Record I-I-451). However, the passing of Elizabeth Ogle and the division of her lands by her sons finally set the stage for the town of Christiana to be able to be developed.

Sources

Smoky Mountain Clans, Donald B. Reagan, 1978, p 128b. ‘The English Origin of John Ogle’,

Francis Hamilton Hibbard, 1967, p 9-14, 16.

Pedigrees of Some of the Emperor Charlemagne’s Descendants, Langston & Buck, 1986, p 199.

‘Ogle & Bothal’, Sir Henry Ogle, 1902, Pedigree XIB.

Calendar of Delaware Wills, New Castle County, 1682-1800. Historical Dames of Delaware, Frederick H. Hitchcock, New York.

Records of the Court of New Castle, Vol. II, 1681-1699. Published by the Colonial Society of Pennsylvania, Meadville, PA, 1935

http://www.smokykin.com/ged/f000/f37/a0003794.htm

http://www.oghgul.org/Ahnentafel/Chart-uk/geneuk.htm

http://www.colonialswedes.org/Forefathers/Yocum.html John Ogle’s House, formerly at Ogletown, Delaware.

John Ogle (1644 – 1683)
8th great-grandfather

Thomas Ogle (1675 – 1734)
son of John Ogle

Thomas Edward Ogle sr (1721 – 1803)
son of Thomas Ogle

William “Billy” Ogle (1756 – 1803)
son of Thomas Edward Ogle sr

Thomas J Ogle Sr (1784 – 1862)
son of William “Billy” Ogle

Nancy Ogle (1810 – 1844)
daughter of Thomas J Ogle Sr

Richard Reason Reagan (1830 – 1912)
son of Nancy Ogle

Nancy Elizabeth Reagan (1849 – 1931)
daughter of Richard Reason Reagan

Martha Elizabeth Abbott/Whitaker/Goode (1872 – 1911)
daughter of Nancy Elizabeth Reagan

Ben Cates Goode (1909 – 1980)
Son of Charles Key Goode

Evelyn Goode Miller 1939-
Daughter of Ben Cates GoodeJohn Ogle House