Martha Jane Huskey 5th Great Grandmother


Martha Jane Huskey

Dec. 9, 1756
Wake County
North Carolina, USA
Death:
1826
Gatlinburg
Sevier County
Tennessee, USA

The little settlement of White Oak Flats, nestled in the Great Smokey Mountains on the south end of Sevier County, Tennessee was “Pioneered by Martha Jane “Huskey” Ogle”
Martha Jane Huskey and her husband William “Billy” Ogle
are a great part of “Sevier County History”

Martha was born in Wake County, North Carolina. She was the daughter of John Frederick Huskey and Rebecca Washington-Huskey.

Martha Jane Huskey married William “Billy” Ogle, he was born in New Castle, Delaware and was the son of Thomas Ogle and Elizabeth “Robeson” Ogle.

Martha Jane Huskey and William “Billy” Ogle married in 1778 in North Carolina. Martha and William had the following Children;

1. Hercules “Hike” Ogle
2. Rebecca Ogle
3. Thomas J. Ogle    ****our ancestor
4. John “Johnny” Ogle
5. Isaac “Shucky” Ogle
6. William “Black Bill” Ogle
7. Mary Ann Ogle

Historical “Ogle Cabin”-tarted by William “Billy” Ogle and finished by Matha Jane Huskey-Ogle her son’s and other family members

Martha’s husband, William “Billy” Ogle, came to Tennessee from South Carolina and was among one of the first to permanently settle in the Gatlinburg area. It is said that William Ogle hunted with the Indian friends in the area and decided to build a Cabin and move his family there. With help from the local Cherokee, he cut and hewed logs to build Cabin. He returned to South Carolina to retrieve his family. William had to grow a crop, in order to bring supplies for the family’s survival an epidemic of malaria broke out and William “Billy” Ogle died of the fever Around 1803-1807 Martha Jane Huskey-Ogle her children and her brother Peter Huskey and several other family members, journeyed to the area now called Gatlinburg to complete her late husband “William “Billy” Ogle Dream”. They found the waiting logs and Martha’s son’s Built the Ogle Cabin.It still stands today in the Great Smokey Mountains *Historical Ogle Cabin

After the death of William, Martha took her five sons and two daughters for a short visit with relatives in Virginia. Her brother, Peter Huskey, and his family then accompanied them on their long trip to the East Tennessee area to establish their home

According to the church minutes of “Fork of Little Pigeon Church”, Martha Ogle was the one of the group of people from White Oak Flats Community that asked the Fork of Little Pigeon Church to establish a church in White Oak Flats as an arm of the church in Sevierville in December 1817.

Reference:
“Smoky Mountain Clans”, Donald B. Reagan, 1974, p 37-38.
“Sevier County, Tennessee and Its Heritage”, 1994, p 229.
“Mountain Ways”, Gene Aiken, 1983, p 3.

White Oak Flats cemantery

This is the second view of White Oak Flats Cemetery in Gatlinburg, Tennessee. Originally called the White Oak Flats settlement due to the abundant white oak trees in the valley, Gatlinburg was settled by English, Scotch, Irish, and Scotch-Irish immigrants in the early 1800s, with the cemetery dating back to around 1830. The serene, tree lined graveyard nestled above the bustling Parkway in downtown Gatlinburg contains the gravesites of many of Gatlinburg’s earliest settlers and prominent citizens.
Names include Ogle, Huskey, McCarter, Maples, Reagan and Whaley; the first families to settle the valley of the Little Pigeon River and its tributaries. Most heads of households during the early 1800s were Revolutionary War veterans. They came here to claim title to 50-acre tracts of land allotted to each for their patriotic service.
A middle-aged widow, Martha Jane Huskey Ogle, was the first official settler here, settling on the land earned by her husband, who died before he could move here with his family. Nonetheless, Martha Jane led her family across the Smoky Mountains to start a new life in what Billy Ogle had described as a “Land of Paradise” in what is now East Tennessee. She is buried in White Oak Flats Cemetery.
Ogle Family Lore – Smokey Mt Clans

Source: ‘Smoky Mountain Clans’, Donald B. Reagan, 1974, p 37-38. ‘Smoky Mountain Family Album,’ Gladys Trentham Russell, 1984, p 6. IGI, Batch 8113402, Sheet 49, Source Call Number 1260889, Film, also, Film 449514, Ordinance # 280.., Temple Swiss. ‘In the Shadow of the Smokies,’ Smoky Mountain Historical Society, 1993, 575. ‘Sevier County, Tennessee and Its Heritage’, 1994, p 229. ‘Mountain Ways’, Gene Aiken, 1983, p 3.

Ogle Cabin2

Kitchen

Marker

Newspaper climping

Martha Jane Huskey (1756 – 1826)
5th great-grandmother
Thomas J Ogle Sr (1784 – 1862)
son of Martha Jane Huskey
Nancy Ogle (1810 – 1844)
daughter of Thomas J Ogle Sr
Richard Reason Reagan (1830 – 1912)
son of Nancy Ogle
Nancy Elizabeth Reagan (1849 – 1931)
daughter of Richard Reason Reagan
Martha Elizabeth Abbott/Whitaker/Goode (1872 – 1911)
daughter of Nancy Elizabeth Reagan
Ben Cates Goode (1909 – 1980)
son of Martha Elizabeth Abbott/Whitaker/Goode
Evelyn Deloris Goode
You are the daughter of Ben Cates Goode

William “Billy” Ogle 5th Great Grandfather


Birth                                                                                                   William Billy Ogle
Oct., 1754
New Castle County
Delaware, USA
Death:
Mar., 1803
Edgefield County
South Carolina, USA

William “Billy” Ogle and his Wife Martha Jane “Huskey” Olge are a great part of “Sevier County History” in Tennessee. William “Billy Ogle born in New Castle, Delaware and was the son of Thomas Ogle and Elizabeth “Robeson” Ogle. In 1778 William Ogle married Martha Jane Huskey in North Carolina. Matha Jane Huskey born in Wake County, North Carolina, she was the daughter of John Frederick Huskey and Rebecca B “Washington” Ogle.

William Ogle and Matha Jane “Huskey” Ogle had the folling Children;

1. Hercules “Hike” Ogle
2. Rebecca Ogle
3. Thomas J. Ogle   *****our ancestor
4. John “Johnny” Ogle
5. Isaac “Shucky” Ogle
6. William “Black Bill” Ogle
7. Mary Ann Ogle

History of William “Billy” Ogle Facts, Sources and Tales

Historical Ogle Cabin-Started by William “Billy” Ogle and finished by Matha Jane Huskey-Ogle, her son’s and other family members

William “Billy” Ogle came to Tennessee from South Carolina and was among one of the first to permanently settle in the Gatlinburg area. It is said that William Ogle hunted with the Indian friends in the area and decided to build a Cabin and move his family there. With help from the local Cherokee, he cut and hewed logs to build Cabin. He returned to South Carolina to retrieve his family. William had to grow a crop, in order to bring supplies for the family’s survival an epidemic of malaria broke out and William “Billy” Ogle died of the fever Around 1803-1807 Martha Jane Huskey-Ogle her children and her brother Peter Huskey and several other family members, journeyed to the area now called Gatlinburg to complete her late husband “William “Billy” Ogle Dream”. They found the waiting logs and Martha’s son’s Built the Ogle Cabin.It still stands today *Historical Ogle Cabin

*Source American Genealogical-Biographical Index

Name: William Ogle
Birth Date: 1750
Birthplace: Delaware
Volume: 127
Page Number: 215
Biographical Info: Revolutionary War
Reference:(813): 1050

*Source– Revolution War Records for Pvt William Ogle in Captain John Bogg’s Co. of Militia of the Delaware State in 2nd Batt’n Commanded by Col Counch

*Source– Rowan County, North Carolina Court Minutes 1773-1786″, William Ogle, with his brothers Thomas and Hercules Ogle, is listed in Names of Persons who have not taken the Oath of Allegiance in Captain Cox’s District.” 1778.

*Source– U.S. International Marriages 1756 in North Carolina

*Source–1790 United Staes Census Name:William Ogle
Home in 1790 (City, County, State):
Edgefield, South Carolina
Number of Household Members:7

*Source– Oct 19,1795, Thomas Ogle of Grayson County, Virginia deeded 100 acres of land in Rowan County, North Carolina, to “William Ogle of Edgefield County, state of South Carolina”. William later sold this same tract of land to Mark Cole and Jacob Skeene on 30 Oct 1795 (Deed Book 14, p 178 and p 179/80).

*Source–On 7 March 1796, William Ogle added to his holdings in Edgefield District, South Carolina, another 100 acres of land purchased from George Hagood. This land was situated on “the branches of Rockey Creek, waters of Savannah River” (Deed Book 13, p 198).

*Source–1800 Census taken in South Carolina
William Ogle is listed Head of Household in Edgefield, South Carolina

*Source–William Ogle-Between the date of his will, 26 Feb 1803, and the date of probate, 5 March 1803, William Ogle died and was survived by his wife, Martha and his children, five sons and two daughters.

William Ogle’s Will “I give unto my son Harculous Ogle that Hundred Acres of Land he Now lives. Also the remainder of the Land is to be Divided among four Boys except a Child’s Share which I give unto My beloved Wife Polly Ogle (Martha in the 1811 deed). Also I give unto my beloved daughter Rebecca (Mc) Carter a cow and Calf, bed and furniture, Pot and Some other furniture. Also I
give unto my beloved grandson William (Mc) Carter a young sow. Also the rest of the property to be Equally among all the rest of my children except my beloved Wife which draws a Child’s share.” His will was recorded in Edgefield County, South Carolina, Will Book “A”, box 22, #783.

William Ogle is buried in the Fruit Hill area.
Birth and Death dates are est

——————–
Reference; Smoky Mountain Clans”, Donald B. Reagan, 1978, p 138-139.
“Smoky Mountain Family Album,” Gladys Trentham Russell, 1984, p 6.
“Sevier County, Tennessee and Its Heritage”, 1994, p 229.
“Mountain Ways”, Gene Aiken, 1983, p 3.

Sources; 1.[S104] Cocke County, Tennessee, and its People, Cocke County Heritage Book Committee, (Walsworth Publishing, 1992), 188.
2.[S120] A Place Called Home: Our Story, David L. Popiel, Duay O’Neil, et. al., (2006, The Newport Plain Talk / Jones Media Inc.), dpopiel@xtn.net., 1

 

william ogle cabin

 

Relationship to me
William “Billy” Ogle (1754 – 1803)
5th great-grandfather

Thomas J Ogle Sr (1784 – 1862)
son of William “Billy” Ogle

Nancy Ogle (1810 – 1844)
daughter of Thomas J Ogle Sr

Richard Reason Reagan (1830 – 1912)
son of Nancy Ogle

Nancy Elizabeth Reagan (1849 – 1931)
daughter of Richard Reason Reagan

Martha Elizabeth Abbott/Whitaker/Goode (1872 – 1911)
daughter of Nancy Elizabeth Reagan

Ben Cates Goode (1909 – 1980)
son of Martha Elizabeth Abbott/Whitaker/Goode

Evelyn Deloris Goode
You are the daughter of Ben Cates Goode

 

uster rollWilliam Ogle flag

Sophia Bosley 4th Great Grandmother


 

Mountain-Laurel

Mountain Laurel

The Life of Sophia Bosley

Sophia Bosley (1789 July 1857), wife of Thomas J. Ogle (1784-1862 would probably fit in just as well in the twenty-first century as she did in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth. an examination of her life shows that she must have been a determined, strong, adaptable woman who could survive- and prevail-almost anywhere.                Early Life  Born  in MD in 1789, Sophia somehow ended up in SC. No information on her family has been found so far. There were Bosley families in the Edgefield-Abbeville-District 96 region of SC. around the turn of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, and probably Sophia belonged to one of those groups who had migrated from Maryland. Apparently there are five major branches of Bosley’s and perhaps one day we will be able to place Sophia on her proper twig. In 1803 Sophia was fourteen years old, and Thomas J. Ogle was nineteen. Something about her attracted Thomas’ eye-perhaps her distinctive red hair. Whatever the reason-beauty, personality, or red hair-there was an attraction between the couple.  Eighteen hundred three had been an eventful year for Thomas. His grandfather died; his father died; he made a long a long trip with his family to Virginia to visit his grieving relatives, an now, in 1804, his mother wanted to take the family west to the wilderness of the East Tennessee mountains. That would mean leaving Sophia. We would probably would not be too far from reality in guessing that his marriage proposal was one of the “O, come with me and be my love,” varieties. No matter how much she loved him, Sophia needed to have been brave too. The trip would be long. She would be far from her family. There was danger from animals and unfriendly Indians. Maybe Thomas pled his case for a long time or maybe Sophia right away. Whichever happened, the two were married, and off they trekked with the rest of the Ogle, Huskey, and McCarter clans to Tennessee.                                                                Life in Tennessee The group named the new area White Oak Flats after the flat lands along the river and the White Oaks that grew there. It remained White Oak Flats until the Civil War era when it became Gatlinburg. Sophia and Thomas had fourteen children, all born in Sevier County. They were Easter (years later Easter’s husband would be the first person buried in White Oak Flats), Martha, William T. Nancy (from whom we descended), Harkness T, Thomas T, Mary, Isaac T, Marriah, Eliza, Preston, Levi, Caleb, Sophia, and Elvira. The fourteen children alone are enough to attest to Sophia’s strength and stamina. Sophia’s Religious Life Sophia was a farmer’s wife, but her husband fared well and acquired from his father, from purchases, from a grant for his service in the War of 1812 and Indian wars, and even by seizing and occupying unclaimed land.  When Thomas donated the first land for the White Oak Flat church, Sophia may have been in the background. She was a very religious woman and meet weekly with other women of the settlement to pray that God would send them a minister of their own and a church of their own. Sophia’s mother-in-law, Martha Jane Huskey Ogle (1760/64-1825/26), led a group of people who portioned The Forks of the River Baptist Church in Sevierville to establish a branch of that church in Gatlinburg. That fledgling church was formed 1817, but no church building was built until 1855. Sophia and Thomas were charter members of the original White Oak Flats church group, but Sophia still campaigned for a “real” church of their own. One of the stories about Sophia’s steadfast drive for a minister and church say’s that she led prayer meetings each week in a laurel grove. According to the book Sketches of Tennessee’s pioneer Baptist Preachers, Sophia, her family, and her steadfast friends WALKED FOURTEEN MILES EACH SATURDAY AND SUNDAY from White Oak Flats to Sevierville where the Forks of the River Baptist church was located, carrying their shoes to keep them from getting muddy, and walked the fourteen miles back home again. Sophia’s prayers were finally answered. Her third son, William T, became a minister. He was ordained at Bethel Church in Sevier County in 1836. It had taken Sophia about 30 years of praying to get ” their own minister.” A few years later, Caleb, another of Sophia’s sons became a minister, too. She was also the great aunt of Richard Evans, a highly respected pioneer minister, She may have influenced a number of other young relatives to enter the ministry, for a quick count of our assorted Ogle cousins reveals at least nineteen Ogle ministers during the nineteenth century.

End of Life Sophia died 13 July 1857 at sixty-eight years of age. She and her husband had been married over fifty years. Thomas outlived his wife by five years, dying at age 78 in 1862. They were buried in White Oak Flats Cemetery in Gatlinburg. Sophia was a strong, determined woman. She was an early “western pioneer” ; she endured hardships; she raised fourteen children; she shared a long marriage with her husband, and she made a pronounced effect on religion in the community. She made a difference.

Sophia Bosley (1784 – 1857)
4th great-grandmother

Nancy Ogle (1810 – 1844)
daughter of Sophia Bosley

Richard Reason Reagan (1830 – 1912)
son of Nancy Ogle

Nancy Elizabeth Reagan (1849 – 1931)
daughter of Richard Reason Reagan

Martha Elizabeth Abbott/Whitaker/Goode (1872 – 1911)
daughter of Nancy Elizabeth Reagan

Ben Cates Goode (1909 – 1980)
son of Martha Elizabeth Abbott/Whitaker/Goode

Evelyn Deloris Goode
You are the daughter of Ben Cates Goode

 

Thomas Ogle J Ogle Sr. 7th Great Grandfather


 

war of 1812
Thomas went with his parents to Ninety Six District, Edgefield County, South Carolina from Wilkes County, Georgia.

Tom was named with his brother, Hercules, as coexecutor of their father’s will in 1803 in Edgefield District, South Carolina. He also signed the 1811 deed of conveyance which disposed of the land left by William Ogle to his “four boys”. Another deed, dated in 1825 and disposing of land in Edgefield District, South Carolina, was signed by Thomas and Sophia Ogle. They had apparently rented out this land after moving to Sevier County, Tennessee.

No Tennessee land grants prior to 1824 were found for Tom Ogle but it is known that he was in Sevier County as early as 1805. He and Hercules Ogle deeded 48 acres of land at the mouth of Walden’s Creek to William Murphy in 1807. According to the deed, found in the Tennessee State Library and Archives, they held title to the land “by virtue of seizure and occupancy”. The exact date of Tom’s settlement in Gatlinburg is not known but he was one of the first settlers there.

Records of Tom’s service in the War of 1812 were found in the National Archives. He served in Captain Andrew Lawson’s Company of East Tennessee Drafted Militia Regiment, commanded by Colonel William Johnson, and fought against the Creek Indians. In 1850 and 1855, Tom received bounty land grants as a result of his service.

In December of 1817 when the White Oak Flats Baptist Church was formed as an arm of the Sevierville church, Tom Ogle and his wife were listed as charter members. The first church building was started in 1855 on Tom’s land. It was located where the Arrowcraft Shop stands now. A deed conveying title of the land to the church by Thomas Ogle was executed on 8 April 1861. This is found in Sevier County Courthouse in Deed Book M, page 211.

Thomas J. Ogle has three land entries, which are dated from 1 May 1824 through 23 Jan 1826, in the Surveyor’s Book No. 1 of Sevier County, Tennessee. These land entries were granted by the state of Tennessee. All these were located in the White Oak Flats community and Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

Tom left a will dated 27 Sep 1861 and probated in County Court in February of 1862. It is recorded in Will Book I, p 74-75. William T. Ogle is mentioned as Tom’s eldest son and is named executor of the will. Also Tom mentioned “my son Thomas Ogle… my Sons, to wit., Preston, Levi and Caleb…” In the Court records, Thomas Ogle’s will was admitted for probate 3 Feb 1862. On 3 March 1862, Caleb Ogle and Wilson Duggan were appointed administrators of the estate of Thomas Ogle. (Court Minutes Book I, page 747 and 752)

There is a list of “Inventory of the property belonging to the estate of Thomas J. Ogle, Dec’d., late of Sevier County, Tennessee in the Inventory Book, page 190/92.

In the GUARDIANS, EXECUTORS and ADMINISTRATORS Settlement Book for Sevier County, Tennessee, there is a record for the estate of Thomas J. Ogle. From this book, the following list of the living heirs of Thomas J. Ogle is quoted: “the above Settlement shows that there is in the hands of the administrators the sum of $187.23 to be equally divided among twelve heirs, to wit., Levi, Hercules, Isaac, Rebecca wife of Preston, William T., Celeb, Thomas, Esther Trantham, Hichols Ownsby, Jacob Evans, Andrew Conner, and David Owensby & wife.”

The family appears in the Federal Census records of Sevier County from 1830 through 1860. The census and other records found show that the second generation of Ogle sons in Gatlinburg began using their father’s initial in their names when there was confusion created by the same names.
———-
Reference
“Smoky Mountain Clans”, Donald B. Reagan, 1974, p 47-48.
“Smoky

 

WILL OF THOMAS OGLE

Written will of Thomas Ogle of the State of Tennessee and county of Sevier I Thomas Ogle do publish this my last will & Testament hereby Revoking and making void all other wills made by me at any time -1st        I direct that my Funeral expenses be paid, and all my debts be paid after my death, as soon as possible out of any money I may have on hand or the first that comes to hand – Second, I give and bequeath all the Land on the south west side of Bearskin Creek, in other words, all the Land on the Right hand side of said creek when going up the creek – That I am lawfully seized & possessed of, or that I lawfully own, to my son – Thomas Page 75Ogle.  3rd          I Give and bequeath the Remainder of my Land including all on both sides of the River to the other three of my Sons, to wit, Preston Levi and Caleb, to be equally divided between the three above named boys – I also order that it be so divided that Levis part, include the building where he now lives – and that Caleb’s part include the Building where I live -I also direct that in case the three above named sons cannot agree in the division of said Land, that they Elect three unconnected disinterested Men to divide said Land – also in case any one or more of them should Refuse to Elect men as above mentioned that any one or more of them may make such Election – and all be bound thereby as much so as if they had went into such Election of Men.4th        I direct that all my personal Property be equally divided between all of my living children at my decease Lastly I do nominate Wm Ogle my Eldest son my Executor in Witness whereof I do to this my will set my hand and seal this the 27th day of September 1861.                                                                                                his                                                                                    Thomas X Ogle                                                                                                mark Signed sealed and published in our presents and we have subscribed our names hereunto in the presents of the Testator this the 27th day of September 1861.                                                                                    Aaron Ownby                                                                                    Bradford Ogle

Lineage

Thomas J Ogle Sr (1784 – 1862)
4th great-grandfather

Nancy Ogle (1810 – 1844)
daughter of Thomas J Ogle Sr

Richard Reason Reagan (1830 – 1912)
son of Nancy Ogle

Nancy Elizabeth Reagan (1849 – 1931)
daughter of Richard Reason Reagan

Martha Elizabeth Abbott/Whitaker/Goode (1872 – 1911)
daughter of Nancy Elizabeth Reagan

Ben Cates Goode (1909 – 1980)
son of Martha Elizabeth Abbott/Whitaker/Goode

Evelyn Deloris Goode
You are the daughter of Ben Cates Goode

Thomas Ogle beside Wife Sophia Bosley-Ogle HeadstoneThomas J Ogle